Sep 29, 2020  
2013-2014 Graduate Academic Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Graduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Graduate Early Education

  
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    GEE 504 - Supporting Children and Families


    Students analyze the relationship between families,and the early childhood setting, from supporting,low income parents with newborn infants to,providing information and support for young,children with special needs. Students examine,theories and models of family systems, and,research community agencies and laws that support,parents. Advocacy is a major theme within this,course
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    GEE 505 - Supporting Children with Special Needs


    Students examine and analyze infant, toddler, and,preschool typical and atypical development in the,areas of motor, cognitive, social, and language,development. They will gain insight into the,unique aspects of Early Childhood Special,Education including the importance of strong,relationships, and the emphasis on play and,sensory exploration.
    Prerequisite(s): GEE-501
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    GEE 506 - Observation, Desc & Doc W/Young Children


    Students discuss and evaluate various types of,observation and recording tools, as well as,the advantages and disadvantages associated with,each. Students examine how to set goals, plan,,and choose the best documentation tool for,specific situations and gain techniques for,organizing, analyzing and interpreting,observation data in order to improve program,quality and to best meet the needs of individual,children.
    Prerequisite(s): GEE-501
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    GEE 520 - Early Language and Literarcy


    Students focus their studies on language,acquisition and literacy development in a child’s,first and additional languages. They examine,typical and atypical development and the various,contexts in which children develop, and explore,the diversity of communication styles in,families, communities, and cultures.,Additionally, students examine the impact,of being educated in a second language and,negotiating schooling with a disability or other,learning challenge. Students use assessment,techniques and organizational approaches to,literacy instruction across the preschool and,primary years.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    GEE 522 - Teaching K - Third Grade w/Practicum


    Students analyze teaching and learning in the,Kindergarten through Grade 3 Classroom,-curriculum,design (including the hidden curriculum),,developmentally appropriate practice,,multicultural perspectives, instructional,planning, content selection, and teaching and,assessment strategy development. Students connect,theory and practice,through an integrated Practicum Project.
    Prerequisite(s): GEE-501
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    GEE 524 - Infant/Toddler Dev & Curriculum w/Pract


    Focuses on the development of infants and,toddlers and guides students through the,exploration of the relationship between,children’s development and curriculum design.,Students examine a relationship-based curriculum,model that emphasizes the importance of the,parent/teacher/child system and design curricula,to promote the four domains of learning and,development: cognitive, language & literacy,,social & emotional, and physical. A minimum of,12 hour internships in infant/toddler classroom,required for practical experiences with both,development and curriculum design.
    Prerequisite(s): GEE-501
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    GEE 532 - Math and Science for Young Children


    Students examine theories, standards, principles,,and practices in teaching mathematics and science,to young children ages birth to nine. Students,develop an integrated math and science curriculum,that includes appropriate content, processes,,environment and materials, and child-centered,choices based on a theoretical understanding of,how children learn math and science. The students,also apply NCTM standards and principles as they,plan and implement math and science activities,for children using a play and discovery approach.
    Prerequisite(s): GEE-501
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    GEE 540 - Curriculum Synthesis for Administrators


    Students will develop a fundamental understanding,of Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) and,the four domains of learning and development:,cognitive, physical, language and literacy, and,social and,emotional. DAP serves as the Early Care and,Education field’s underlying guide to curricular,decision-making. Students will examine DAP and,apply it to their program’s curriculum.
    Prerequisite(s): GEE-501
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    GEE 541 - HR in the Early Childhood Setting


    Students will focus on the skills and,sensitivities necessary in professional HR,management. Students will examine their,organization’s vision and,mission. In addition, they will explore,reflective staff supervision, and analyze,standards and procedures for the evaluation,,hiring, and releasing,of staff. Students will evaluate the,relationships among professional development,,staff support, and an organization’s mission, and,focus on challenges and benefits specific to,early childhood setting.
    Prerequisite(s): GEE-501.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    GEE 542 - Admin. of Early Childhood Programs


    Early childhood program administrators manage a,variety of responsibilities. Students will,examine essential elements within a program,administrators’ job description including,developing a program philosophy, adhering to,licensing regulations, investigating early,childhood ethics, grant writing, and empowering,staff.
    Prerequisite(s): GEE-501
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    GEE 543 - Fin. Mgmt. Early Child. Ed.


    Students will examine the unique financial needs,of early childhood programs such as limited,access to income resources, high personnel,costs,and meeting regulatory requirements.,Through the use of a case study approach,,students will explore financial tools that,include, budgeting, break even analysis, cash,flow, staffing analysis, and reconciliation,,grant writing. Students will also assess the,application of these tools within their own early,childhood programs.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    GEE 600 - Action Research Project I


    Credit(s): 3
  
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    GEE 610 - Action Research Project II


    Students finalize their Action Research Project,data collection and analysis and write-up their,research and make recommendations for the field,of Early Care and Education. In addition,,students prepare their findings for dissemination,in the field in the form of conference,presentation request for proposals, workshop,outlines, or journal article submissions.,Students work closely with the course instructor,throughout the course, and ultimately present,their findings to fellow Champlain College,students.
    Credit(s): 3

Law

  
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    LAW 5000 - Integrated Reflective Practice


    Taught through the required residency experience,,this course provides the basis of both the,philosophy and the professional development,perspective used in all subsequent management,courses. Students will complete a thorough,,multi-dimensional self-assessment that culminates,in a personal learning road map to guide their,journey through the entire graduate program. The,emphasis of the content will be on the importance,of work practice and experience as a basis for,management development and on the use of,experience for personal and organizational,learning. Short case studies will also address the,integration of learning through the six Areas of,Practice: Global, Organizational & Personal,Values-Based Leadership; Innovation through,Information; Financial and Economic Resources;,Customers, Markets, Sales and Marketing; Human,Resources and Organizational Relationships; and,Measurement and Process Improvement.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5100 - Legal System and Legal Principles


    This course provides students with an overview of,the American legal system, including the concept,and development of law. State and federal court,systems and jurisdictions are compared, and,students are introduced to the sources and areas,of law, legal remedies and the litigation process.,Students learn how to read and analyze legal,documents. Students get hands-on practice at,finding law and legal analysis using the,LexisNexis legal information database and the,legal research capabilities of the Internet. The,course further focuses on determining the,applicable law and applying this law to legal,problem in some of the areas that affect,businesses day-to-day including ethical business,conduct policies, consumer protection, human,resources and employment issues, real estate,,intellectual property and corporate change and,governance.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5101 - Legal Principles


    Students learn the structure of the U.S.,government and the significant legal principles,that control its operation. Students explore,federalism; sources of law; and how laws are,interpreted. They examine the structure of the,court system; the role of lawyers, judges, and,juries; and ethical issues. Finally, students,analyze civil law and how this classification of,law and its procedures are utilized to resolve,legal disputes.
    Credit(s): 2
  
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    LAW 5200 - ADR and Conflict Management


    This course offers an overview of an array of,dispute resolution processes useful within,business organizations and in relations between,organizations and individuals. Essential terms and,theories are covered, and questions of when each,process — mediation, negotiation, arbitration,,and others – is and is not applicable. Students,learn how to analyze conflicts and adopt,strategies for the productive handling of conflict,that avoids litigation and improves outcomes.,Students gain experience and practice on issues,involving conflict, power, working in groups, and,the decision-making process. An additional focus,will be the creation of pro-active conflict,management systems within and between,organizations.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5210 - Constitutional Law


    Students learn about the Constitution as the basis,of individual rights as well as our federal,government, laws, and legal system. Students,examine the doctrines of judicial review,,federalism, and separation of powers, and learn,the practical and theoretical fundamentals of,constitutional thought and law. Topics include due,process, equal protection, the commerce clause,,the separation of powers, and individual rights.,Through actual cases and problems, students gain,skills to for analyzing constitutional issues in,their fields of practice and seeing the,constitutional dimensions of their professional,decisions.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5220 - Contracts and Commercial Law


    This course provides students with an overview of,the legal environment and principles that affect,contracts and commercial transactions, with an,emphasis on Articles Two of the Uniform Commercial,Code. Students focus on contract law, including,the elements of a valid contract; an analysis of,the formation, transfer and termination of,contract rights and duties; what is required in,performance; and the legal and equitable remedies,available upon breach of contract.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5230 - Information Privacy and Security


    Rapid developments in information technologies,have resulted in heightened concern with,information security in every area of business and,government practice. This course will explore the,laws and practices affecting personal privacy in a,digital age and the information security needs of,all those maintaining substantial and potentially,sensitive records. Topics include internet,privacy, including issues related to anonymity,,commercial profiling, spam, hacking and viruses;,database privacy in areas such as medical and,financial records; identity theft; and the,relationship of law enforcement to privacy,,including issues related to wiretapping,,surveillance, and counter-terrorism.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5240 - Litigation


    Students learn the laws and rules of civil,procedure so that they will understand what to,expect if they must work with counsel in litigated,conflicts. Successful students understand how a,lawsuit is prepared, including the drafting of,pleadings, motions, discovery, and other legal,actions and documents used in litigation. Students,also consider case law and the rules of criminal,procedure to grasp how criminal law is,administered, including police investigative,techniques, laws of arrest, search and seizure,,self-incrimination, right to counsel,,interrogation and confessions, pre-trial motions,,standards of evidence and proof, and trial,procedures.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5250 - Tort & Personal Injury Law


    This course offers an introduction to tort law,with emphasis on the potential liability of,business organizations and the individuals within,them for injuries to property and person.,Considered are intentional wrongs, negligence,,malpractice, products liability and strict,liability; invasions of personal integrity and,emotional well-being; injury to tangible and,intangible rights in property; liability insurance,and alternatives; and damages. While learning the,different types of tort actions, students identify,the causes of action, determine whether legal,elements of these torts can be demonstrated, and,analyze case studies to establish principles and,guidelines for managerial applications.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5310 - Business Organizations


    This course examines the basic forms of business,organizations, including the law of sole,proprietorships, partnerships and corporations.,Topics include the authority and responsibility of,partners and the responsibility between corporate,directors, officers, shareholders, and creditors.,The course also covers the principles of agency,law.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5311 - Administrative Law


    This course explores the role of administrative,law in areas of business and managerial practice,affected by government regulation. Students review,the sources of law and chart the overlapping and,sometimes conflicting roles of federal and state,legal regulation, studying the implications and,effects of the various types of laws that may,affect their activities: administrative agency,regulations, constitutional provisions, statutes,,and court decisions. Topics include agency powers,and operation, determination and promulgation of,administrative regulations; right to notice and,hearing; enforcement; judicial review; standing;,and the Administrative Procedure Act.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5312 - Employment Law


    This course offers an overview of fundamental,areas of employment law. Topics include job,discrimination and related laws, labor law and,labor relations, plant and job safety, public,officers and employees, employee contracts,,self-employment, Americans with Disabilities Act,,Equal Employment Opportunity Act, non-competition,agreements, workers’ compensation, unemployment,obligations, and personnel issues such as drug,testing, lie detectors, whistle-blowing, and,wrongful discharge.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5320 - Federal Employment Statutes and,Regulations


    This course provides students with an introduction,to Federal legislation and administrative,regulations regulating the field of employment.,Topics include Title VII, ADA, ADEA, FMLA, OSHA,,ERISA, and FLSA, and immigration and nationality,law relating to employment, including steps,employers should take to comply with nationality,verification laws, and which persons may or may,not work for U.S. businesses. The National Labor,Relations Act and union organizing will also be,introduced.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5321 - Employment Practices,Workplace Privacy Issues


    This course details the laws that regulate how,employees should be hired, fired, promoted,,disciplined, or evaluated. It explores the steps,an employer should take to avoid allegations of,discrimination during the hiring, firing or,disciplinary process. The course also examines the,legal limits on monitoring an employee?s email,,computer usage, and outside activities, and,examines the legal limits on drug testing,employees and checking an employee’s criminal,,credit, and medical background.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5322 - Discrimination and Tort Law in Employee,Relations


    This course examines the various laws prohibiting,discrimination in the workplace, with a focus on,federal statutes and regulations. Topics include,liability under Title VII, ADA, ADEA, and the,FMLA. The students also learn about how complaints,are filed with and investigated by the EEOC, with,a detailed discussion on how the employer is,required to respond to these complaints. The,course also discusses general tort liability for,both the employee and employer.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5323 - Employment Discrimination


    Examines the various laws prohibiting,discrimination in the workplace, with a focus on,federal statutes and regulations. Topics include,liability under Title VII, the Equal Pay Act, Age,Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), Americans,with Disabilities Act (ADA), and the Family and,Medical Leave Act (FMLA). You will also learn,about how complaints are filed with and,investigated by the Equal Employment Opportunity,Commission (EEOC), with a detailed discussion on,how the employer is required to respond to these,complaints.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5330 - Patient Rights & Protections


    This course reviews the current legal,understanding of patients? rights to control their,own treatment. The relevant statues and,regulations will be considered, including those,regarding hospitals and nursing homes. Students,will examine issues arising in cases of those,diagnosed with mental health disabilities, along,with surrogate decision-making in the treatment of,elders, children and other patients in special,circumstances. The course will also inquire into,the challenges and rights of those who interact,with the health care system as members of,minorities because of race, gender, age,,disability, or genetic condition.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5331 - Government Programs & Entitlements in,Health Care


    This course will cover federal, state and,administrative legal provisions relating to,government health care programs and entitlements.,The regulation of health care providers, both,individuals and organizations, is explored in the,context of Medicare and Medicaid as well as Social,Security and Supplemental Social Security.,Prescription drug programs, food stamps, and fuel,assistance along with relevant insurance,regulation and consumer protections, including,enforcement actions and penalties for fraud and,abuse, will be addressed. Students will learn the,sources of law in this area ranging from the,constitution through statutes, court decisions and,procedures, and agency rules.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5332 - Financial Planning for Elders


    This course will analyze the various financial,tools available to an individual planning for,retirement and late life concerns, and the legal,and regulatory dimensions of those tools.,Pension and savings plans and their regulation,will be discussed, including annuity plans,,individual retirement accounts, and traditional,pension plans. Taxation issues, planning for,health care, and wills and trusts will also be,considered.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5341 - Health Law Issues


    Creates a forum for the exploration and discussion,of important contemporary problems, advances, and,opportunities in the health care field. Topics,range from the social and political forces,affecting health care and health insurance policy,to the ethical and legal dimensions of drug,testing, informed consent, the medical,significance of an aging population, genetic and,biomedical technology, assisted suicide,,palliative care, and end of life issues. Specific,topics may change because the course content will,reflect current issues.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5342 - Patents and Trade Secrets


    This course examines protection of technology,through the federal patent system or the state law,of trade secrets. Patents are granted by the U.S.,Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), a branch of,the Department of Commerce, for inventions of new,and useful compositions, machines, articles of,manufacture or processes. Students will learn the,requirements for a valid patent; the patent,prosecution process; patent infringement,standards, and defenses and remedies. A trade,secret is an idea or information that has,commercial value because it is not widely known.,Students will learn the standards for trade secret,protection and enforcement.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5343 - Copyright Law


    This course examines the types of subject matter,eligible for copyright protection; the scope of,copyright protection; the originality and fixation,requirements; copyright registration, ownership,,licensing, and transfers of rights; and,infringement standards, defenses and remedies.,Current topics such as peer-to-peer file sharing,on the internet and Constitutional issues will,also be explored.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5344 - Trademarks and Unfair Competition


    A trademark is a word, a group of words or a logo,that is used in connection with the sale of goods,to distinguish them from those made or sold by,someone else. This course addresses what,constitutes a protectable trademark; the trademark,registration process; ownership, licensing, and,transfers of rights; infringement standards,,defenses and remedies; and international,protection and enforcement. Related topics such,as domain names, cybersquatting, right of,publicity, and false advertising will also be,examined.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    LAW 5345 - Intellectual Property Law


    Students examine the principal tenets of,intellectual property, including trademarks,,copyrights, patents, and trade secrets. We will,also explore practical aspects of this area of,law, including litigation strategy and theoretical,questions of public policy and the interplay of,state and federal laws affecting intellectual,property.
    Prerequisite(s): LAW-5100
    Credit(s): 3

Management

  
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    MGMT 515 - Strategic Human Resource Management


    Students will gain a strategic perspective of,Human Resource Management including linkages,between business strategy and the human resource,performance needed for an organization to achieve,its vision. Students learn about critical HR,competencies and various HR roles of supervisors,and HR practitioners. Upon completion of this,course students will be proficient in translating,business objectives into HR strategies - to,achieve competitive advantage and/or,organizational effectiveness through people.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MGMT 520 - Managing Talent to Create Organizational,Excellence


    Talent management is the process of attracting,and retaining talented employees, cultivating,critical knowledge and skills, and recognizing,that,employees’talents and skills drive organizational,success. Using a manager’s strategic,perspective,students study how to recognize and,develop employees’ talents, evaluate performance,,and influence behavior within regulatory,constraints.Students focus on the critical,interrelationship between organizational culture,and traditional human resources topics. Other,themes include related ethical issues, the global,workforce, and links between social,responsibility, culture and business success. ,(Prereq: MGT 515 Strategic Human Resource,Management)
    Prerequisite(s): MGMT-515
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MGMT 530 - A Supply Chain Introduction


    A supply chain consists of all parties involved,,directly or indirectly, in fulfilling a customer,request. It not only includes the manufacturer,and suppliers, but also transporters, warehouses,,retailers, and customers themselves. Students,are presented with a holistic perspective of a,supply chain in this overview course. Topics,include relationships with supply chain partners,,logistics in the supply chain, performance,measurements, and global dimensions of a supply,chain.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MGMT 535 - Strategic Procurement


    Sourcing goods and services is an important part,of an organization’s strategy and supply chain. ,Students will learn about the development and,management of strategic sourcing relationships,and the role of supply management in effective,supply/demand/value chains. Specific topics,include balancing costs and risk and recognizing,total costs associated with procurement decisions.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MGMT 540 - Inventory, Distribution & Logistics


    As one of a sequence of supply chain-related,courses, students will focus on managing customer,demand and the efficient storage and movement of,inventory, processes that are crucial to meeting,customer demand in a way that is profitable for,the company. They support demand fulfillment for,both end-consumers and business trading partners,and students will learn how these parts fit into,the overall supply chain. Topics include demand,planning, inventory management, and warehouse,operations and transportation.
    Prerequisite(s): MGMT-530
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MGMT 550 - Supply Chain Strategy


    As the capstone of the Graduate Certificate in,Supply Chain Management, students will integrate,concepts learned in previous certificate courses,as they work through an interactive supply chain,simulation. These concepts include supply chain,strategy, total cost approach to decision making,and identifying and planning for risks that may,disrupt their supply chain. Additional topics,include an in-depth study of ethical and,sustainable supply chains. The final project,will be an analysis and evaluation of individual,simulation results.
    Prerequisite(s): MGMT-535
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MGT 515 - Strategic Human Resource Management


    Students will gain a strategic perspective of Human Resource Management including linkages between business strategy and the human resource performance needed for an organization to achieve its vision. Students learn about critical HR competencies and various HR roles of supervisors and HR practitioners. Upon completion of this course students will be proficient in translating business objectives into HR strategies - to achieve competitive advantage and/or organizational effectiveness through people.
    Credit(s): 3

Managing Innovation and Information Technology

  
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    MIT 500 - Foundations of IT Management


    This course provides an introduction to systems,and development concepts, information technology,,computer hardware, data communications and,telecommunications systems and application and,system software. It examines the role of,information management in organizations and how,information may be used to enhance profitability,and customer satisfaction. The concepts of,organizational behavior and business process,re-engineering are introduced. The role of,information as capital is articulated. This course,sets the stage for the remaining courses in the,program. This course is a prerequisite for all the,other courses in this program. It may be taken,concurrently with another course with permission,of the program directors.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MIT 505 - Project Management


    This course is designed to introduce a systematic,process for planning, organizing and controlling,projects. The course will present a practical,methodology for completing projects more quickly,with fewer problems. Student work will consist of,readings, research, class special-topic,presentations, group activities, a project,management journal, and participation in a real,world IT business project. Students will be,encouraged to apply project-management techniques,to solve existing real-world technology-related,business problems.
    Prerequisite(s): MIT-500, MBA-500 or HCM-540
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MIT 510 - Convergence of Telecom & Business


    This course focuses on the business and strategic,implications of data networks and,telecommunications. The emphasis in this course is,not so much on technical details but on the ways,in which communications technology can be,exploited within an organization. It describes the,convergence phenomenon, a dynamic ongoing process,that comprises not only technological convergence,,but the convergence of companies and services,as well. It also addresses the fact that,convergence is much more than a telecommunications,phenomenon: it affects every industry to one,degree or another. The course addresses the,interrelationships of technologies, companies and,services.
    Prerequisite(s): MIT-500
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MIT 515 - Managing Enterprise Data


    IT professionals must understand the issues in,managing database systems. Corporate information,is intellectual capital and it must be safely and,efficiently managed in order to leverage corporate,advantage. This course covers the concepts,,principles, issues and techniques for managing,corporate data resources. Techniques for managing,the design and development of large database,systems including logical data models, concurrent,processing, data distribution, database,administration, data warehousing, and data mining,will be closely examined. The special role of data,management in e-Business will be addressed.
    Prerequisite(s): MIT-500 or MBA-500
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MIT 520 - Legal & Ethical Issues in Technology


    Today there are special legal issues that affect,all aspects of information technology management.,This course surveys the applicable law and how the,law affects the development and deployment of IT.,Special consideration is given to human resource,issues and to the impact of the Internet. For,example, companies that produce Web content and,software for sale have both rights and obligations,surrounding their intellectual property. Because,of the international nature of the Internet these,rights and obligations must cut across,international boundaries. Rules and practices that,apply in the US do not necessarily carry over to,other jurisdictions and a company may have to be,compliant with a variety of different and,sometimes conflicting laws. Contract law has been,a part of software and hardware acquisition and,maintenance for a number of number of years.,However, the growth and evolution of IT has,changed the depth and breadth of this law and old,practices and standards no longer apply. Human,resource issues are important and companies must,be aware of the impact of the law on their own,specific workplace and their operations.
    Prerequisite(s): MIT-500
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MIT 525 - Financial Decision Making for Management


    IT planning, system development and operations,issues cannot be separated from financial,considerations. Anyone involved with strategic,planning and operation needs to understand the,impact of their work on the organization’s bottom,line. Projects may either enhance or degrade cash,flow and IT managers must understand the,implications to corporate profitability. Managers,must understand how the organization’s financial,models work in order to make a meaningful,contribution to the overall success of the,organization. This course surveys the elements of,financial management and their impact on the IT,function. Financial options are considered along,with the special constraints imposed by IT,activities. Tools required to develop successful,business cases and modeling and simulation tools,will be introduced.
    Prerequisite(s): MIT-500 or MBA-500
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MIT 530 - IT Security & Strategy


    The security of information and information,systems is intricately linked to the operation and,assets of any organization. Protecting the,information network infrastructure is essential to,protecting our businesses and organizations. This,course provides the essentials of IT security from,a management perspective. It examines the,processes of security, including information,assurance, privacy, backup and recovery, and,disaster preparedness. This course provides an,overview of information security processes for,managers. Students will examine methodologies for,implementing security, security policies, best,current practices, privacy, backup/recovery,,disaster preparedness, and incident response. The,outcome of this process is a strategic security,plan.
    Prerequisite(s): MIT-500 or MBA-500
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MIT 535 - Enterprise IT Systems


    Business systems are a combination of data,,people, hardware, software and procedures.,Successful systems must be actively designed and,they don’t “just happen”. Successful design must,methodically consider each of these five elements.,This course surveys the latest techniques used,to discover system needs,explore and evaluate,alternatives, and implement systems. The dynamic,role of system and business function evolution is,an integral part of this process. The special,problems engendered by legacy systems are,considered too. This course provides conceptual,understanding of “where systems come from” and,provides practical knowledge for managing the,system development process.
    Prerequisite(s): MIT-500
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MIT 540 - Managing Innovation through Information Technology


    Successful companies today cannot afford to operate with old organizational structures and practices. Customers expect excellent service and new products must be brought to market quickly. This course surveys a variety of techniques and philosophies that foster fast product development and outstanding customer service. Organizational, human resource, and technology techniques that support these strategies are reviewed.
    Prerequisite(s): MIT-500 or MBA-500
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MIT 545 - Strategic Planning/Web-Driven Busins


    This course is designed to provide students with,knowledge and skills required to successfully,manage the strategic business planning process,within the context of data, information technology,and web-based business models. Through case,studies, projects and research, students will,develop an understanding of business models in,which value is created through information. The,student will develop a deep understanding of the,business and organizational issues involved in,defining business requirements with both internal,and external customers. Web-based business,strategies will address a variety of business,models. Special emphasis will be given to,the integration and convergence of technologies.
    Prerequisite(s): MIT-500
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MIT 550 - Reflective Leadership and Planned Change


    The increasing complexity of business environments,and rapidly changing global marketplace have,challenged organizations and their members to,become adaptive and innovative. Everyone, from the,CEO on down, is now being asked to adopt new,leadership skills in order for organizations to,survive in this context. This course is designed,to assist managers in meeting this challenge,wherever they exert influence in the organization.,Students will develop the knowledge and skills for,effectively harnessing, navigating and leading,change in their respective organizations; they,will reflect on their experiences as a leader and,assess who they are as a leader based on the,models presented in the course; they will create a,personal leadership philosophy; they will build a,view of change as an ongoing and dynamic process,requiring the deliberate and focused attention of,everyone in the organization and necessitating the,emergence of change leaders; they will identify,how change is accomplished by people and impacts,people, affects organizational relationships, is,driven by financial/market forces and will need to,be measured in terms of organizational results.
    Prerequisite(s): MIT-500, MBA-500 or HCM-540
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MIT 590 - Capstone Project


    The purpose of the Capstone Project is to allow,students to draw upon their educational,experiences in this program in a meaningful way to,design, develop and produce a major project. All,students must complete a Capstone Project prior to,graduation. Students are encouraged to tailor,projects to their academic interests, talents and/,or vocation. They will do projects individually.,Projects may be research studies, case studies, or,other similar endeavors. Students will select a,topic area, do research on the topic, and,synthesize the material into a coherent document.,This document is, in effect, a thesis. Projects,will be approved and supervised by a faculty,mentor.
    Prerequisite(s): MIT-500
    Credit(s): 3

Masters of Business Administration

  
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    MBA 500 - Integrated and Reflective Practice


    This introductory eight week course provides the,philosophical and technical basis for all,subsequent courses. A thorough personal assessment,is completed that results in a personal learning,roadmap that will serve as a guideline for the,entire program. The emphasis will be on importance,of practice and experience as a basis for personal,development as a manager. The course will be a,mixture of self-directed modules for more,technical skills along with reflection with cohort,members on other topics.,,
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 501 - Essentials of Applied Economics


    This course introduces MBA students to the,theories, context, and managerial value of applied,microeconomics and macroeconomics. Basic micro-,and macroeconomic theories will be addressed,within a business context by applying economic,tools and techniques to managerial decision,making. It is designed to provide specific skills,for the workplace as well as establish economic,thinking as an important foundational framework,for the pursuit of advanced business education.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 503 - Using Statistics for Business Decision,Making


    This course introduces MBA students to the,managerial value of using statistical theory and,quantitative analysis to support decision making,within the business context. A variety of useful,analytical methods will be introduced and,exercised. The importance of recognizing and,assessing trends, patterns, and relationships,among business data will be emphasized. This,course is designed to provide specific analytical,skills for the workplace, showcase the powerful,quantitative tools available to business analysts,and management, and provide an important,foundational framework for the pursuit of advanced,business education.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 505 - Strategic Language of Business, The


    This course serves as an introduction to the,strategic and tactical functions of Business that,reconciles traditional functional topics with the,Reflective Integrated Practice model. The,emphasis is on language and concepts, not mastery,of practice in order that students can participate,effectively in Core Content Courses. Students with,a recently awarded degree in Business from an,accredited institution may waive this course upon,approval of the program directors.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 507 - Survey of Accounting for Managers


    This course introduces MBA students to the,theories, context, and managerial value of,financial and management accounting. The role of,accountants, the accounting equation, the,accounting cycle, and financial reporting will be,presented. The use of relevant accounting data to,analyze internal operating decisions, allocate,scare resources, and assess overall firm health,will be emphasized. This course is designed to,provide specific skills for the workplace as well,as showcase the accounting function as an,important foundational framework for the pursuit,of advanced business education.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 510 - Quantitative Language of Business, The


    This course serves as an introduction to the,quantitative language and functions of Business,that reconciles traditional functional topics with,the Reflective Integrated Practice model. The,emphasis is on language and concepts, not mastery,of practice, in order that students can,participate effectively in Core Content Courses.,Students with a recently awarded degree in,Business from an accredited institution may waive,this course upon approval of the program,directors.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 515 - Aligning Mission and Values in a Global,Environment


    This course will provide an overview of how,organizations can succeed in a world characterized,by increasing diversity and the dissolution of,geographical boundaries. Special emphasis will be,placed on identifying, selecting and,systematically building organizational values into,behaviors that bind employees, partners and,customers. Integrates all topic areas into the,concept of values-based leadership.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 520 - Performance Measurement and Accounting,Systems


    Provides an introduction to the concepts of,accounting within the broader context of,performance measurement, to include Balanced,Scorecard and other “dashboard” measures and,metrics used in the workplace. Problems and case,studies will be used that are strategic in nature,and that facilitate the emphasis on the,application of accounting concepts to products,,markets, customers, human resources and process,improvement.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 525 - Process Improvement and Operations


    This course approaches organizational operations,and processes from the perspectives of both their,initial design and continuous improvement. It,links process improvement to financial, economic,and accounting information but within the context,of models of continuous improvement and,organizational learning. These topics are applied,to all content areas of the Integrated Reflective,Practice model.
    Prerequisite(s): MBA-500 and 15 completed credits
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 526 - Advanced Capital and Cash Management


    This course builds on the financial models,presented in MIT 525 by presenting MBA students,additional financial theory, models, context, and,practices of managing a firm?s capital structure,and its control of short term assets, particularly,cash. Valuation and characteristics of equity and,debt capital, capital structure and dividend,policy, working capital management, and an,introduction to International Finance will be,featured. The role of the financial manager as a,key participant in a firm?s short-term and,strategic planning processes will be emphasized.
    Prerequisite(s): MIT-525;
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 530 - Customers, Markets and Sales/Marketing,Programs


    Investigates how organizations define and develop,relationships with customers and clients and then,expands those relationships through marketing and,sales programs. A special emphasis is on the,design and implementation of marketing programs,and the application of learning models to leverage,information obtained from the market. The,implications of market decisions on other areas of,the organization such as supply chain,relationships, operations, human resources,,partners and distributors will be addressed.,,
    Prerequisite(s): MBA-500 and 15 completed credits
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 535 - Business Economics and Modeling Value


    This course will develop the student’s ability to,apply key financial and economic principles to,business models. The course integrates the most,relevant principles of finance, accounting,,economics and financial planning into a,comprehensive framework. Case studies will include,all areas of the Integrated Reflective Practice,model.,,
    Prerequisite(s): MBA-500, MIT-525, and MBA-525
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 540 - Group Dynamics, Communication and,Negotiation


    This course provides the framework for,understanding the dynamics of human interaction,within an organizational context. It is built from,the perspective that a key function of management,is to negotiate for resources and build,collaborative relationships with employees,,vendors, suppliers and distributors.
    Prerequisite(s): MBA-500
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 545 - Action Planning and Decision Making


    Strategy and planning are activities presented as,an interactive and ongoing process that is,increasingly owned by middle management rather,than being a “top down” single stage process. The,process is one of designing, executing and,adjusting thereby allowing strategies to be,refined or even emerge as learning occurs. Because,of the integrative nature of this course, case,studies will address all areas of the Integrated,Reflective Practice model.,,
    Prerequisite(s): MBA-500 and 24 completed credits
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MBA 590 - Field-Based Capstone Project


    This course is built around a project that is,designed to apply, in a comprehensive manner, the,core areas of knowledge around which this program,has been built. These include: Values of a,Global-Based Organization, Innovation through,Information, Financial and Economic Resources,,Customers, Markets, Sales and Marketing; Human,Resources and Organizational Relationships;,Measurement and Process Improvement; and Action,Planning to Create Value.,,The project may be performed for a current,employer, a sponsoring workplace or as an,internship as either a Service Learning project,for a qualifying non-profit organization or,another organization of the student’s choosing.,,
    Prerequisite(s): The MBA 590 Capstone course must be taken only after all ,other courses in the program have been completed.
    Credit(s): 3

Mediation and Applied Conflict Studies

  
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    MED 501 - Negotiation


    Negotiation is one of the basic components of,mediation. This course is designed,to integrate knowledge of negotiation theory and,behaviors into your conflict,intervention strategies. You will focus on the,sources and role of “power” in,negotiation, explore the strengths and weaknesses,of integrative and distributive,bargaining techniques, understand which ones you,tend to use and develop your,ability to manage the consequences of different,negotiation styles coming into,contact with one another.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 502 - Interpersonal Conflict


    Mediators do not check their “conflict selves” at,the door-every mediator is,influenced by beliefs about conflict and the ways,they engage conflict in their,own lives. This course invites you to explore your,”conflict self,” the ways your,own conflict engagement behavior enhances and,limits your effectiveness as an,intervener. You will confront conflict as a way to,more deeply understand and,appreciate the experience you ask your parties to,undertake in each mediation.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 503 - Conflict Intervention Skills


    Students will learn to use tools, techniques, and,strategies used to assist parties in,problem solving and conflict engagement. We will,explore various theoretical,frameworks and approaches to conflict and learn to,identify when specific tools,might be most useful within any given framework.,This course relies heavily on,the concept of reflection in practice and students,will learn how to use selfreflection,as a tool for building competence. The course has,a 9-day residency.
    Prerequisite(s): MED-501.
    Credit(s): 6
  
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    MED 504 - Principles of Conflict Analysis


    An important part of being a competent mediator is,the ability to use conflict,theory to inform practice. This course explores,interdisciplinary theoretical,frameworks for interpreting conflict through a,broad range of academic,disciplines – communications, law, social,psychology, anthropology, and dispute,resolution. Students critically evaluate the,respective bodies of theory and test,theoretical principles against their own,experiences in managing conflict. Current,models, approaches, styles of mediation and their,theoretical underpinnings and,applications are also introduced.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 505 - Fieldwork I


    Students will be expected to observe and,participate in 40 hours of real,mediations/interventions in their home community.,Students will bring questions,and descriptions of real cases for classroom,discussion and supervision. Case,supervision will focus on mastery of skills,,conflict analysis, evaluation of,appropriateness for mediation, and an ability to,utilize conflict theory, application,considerations, agreement writing, and,professionalism.
    Prerequisite(s): MED-503
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 511 - Advanced Practice 1


    Prerequisite(s): Complete the certificate in Mediation and Applied Conflict,Studies,MED-501, MED-502, MED-503, MED-504, MED-505
    Credit(s): 1.5
  
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    MED 512 - Advanced Practice 2


    This is the final mediation skills course and as,such students will improve the integration of the,essential skills. Students will gain artistry in,their practice and apply the array of skills of,the conflict specialist in a variety,of settings. They will learn advanced mediation,techniques as they explore the possible roles of,the mediator/conflict specialist in enduring,conflicts. The course requires a 2.5-day,residency.
    Prerequisite(s): MED-511
    Credit(s): 1.5
  
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    MED 513 - Research Methods for Mediators


    Students develop the practical research,,evaluation and project proposal-writing skills,needed to keep current with, and contribute to,,academic and professional research in the field of,mediation and conflict studies. Through examining,topics of strong interest to students, we will,explore qualitative and quantitative research,methods, create powerful research questions,,design a research strategy, craft a program,evaluation, develop a short literature review and,fonnulate a grant proposal.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 514 - Ethics and Impartiality


    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 515 - Mediation Models and History


    Mediation, as a professional field of practice,,has evolved from a long history of,dispute resolution. Students will inform their,mediation practice through a sampling,of traditional underpinnings in dispute,resolution, an historical tour of mediation in,the United States, surveys of current mediation,models and exploration of a variety,of third party roles.
    Prerequisite(s): MED-503
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 516 - Fieldwork 2


    Students will perform 40 hours of fieldwork.,Through the combination of class work and real,world experience, they will become more proficient,in mediation and related skills and will expand,and deepen their professional networks. Students,will hone specific skills and expand knowledge of,the content areas of their choosing. They will,also develop marketing materials and improve their,ability to describe their work in ways that are,clear and attractive to potential clients and,employers.
    Prerequisite(s): MED-511, MED-505
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 521 - Organizational Conflict


    Students will explore mediation and conflict,management with organizations, work groups,,departments or entire institutions. Issues of,power, role and structure will be addressed and,students will examine basic models of,organizational life and specific approaches and,tools for understanding and engaging organizations,(There are a lot of “ands in the,previous sentence.). Students will investigate,values-based conflicts as they occur in,organizational life and examine how mediator,standards relate to this particular area of,practice. Requires a 2.5-day residency.
    Prerequisite(s): MED-505
    Credit(s): 1.5
  
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    MED 522 - Identity-Based Conflict


    Prerequisite(s): Complete Mediation and Applied Conflict Studies Certificate,MED-501, MED-502, MED-503, MED-504, MED-505
    Credit(s): 1.5
  
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    MED 523 - Facilitation


    Prerequisite(s): Complete Mediation and Applied Conflict Studies Certificate,MED-501, MED-502, MED-503, MED-504, MED-505
    Credit(s): 1.5
  
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    MED 524 - Family Mediation


    Students will explore the scope and practice of,family mediation. They will examine the challenges,of court-referred family mediation and also of,business or estate-planning mediations. Students,willieam and apply tools for analysis and,intervention for family mediation. Because this,type of practice requires interfacing with the,work of other professionals such as attorneys,,accountants, financial planners, alcohol and drug,counselors, and therapists, students will also,consider effectively working with those,professionals. Requires a 2.5-day residency.
    Prerequisite(s): MED-505
    Credit(s): 1.5
  
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    MED 531 - Land Use Mediation


    Prerequisite(s): Complete Mediation and Applied Conflict Studies Certificate,MED-501, MED-502, MED-503, MED-504, MED-505
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 532 - Public Policy


    Students will learn how to design and implement,appropriate change processes for tackling big,problems. To effect change in large, open,,complex systems, process designers have to create,complex and adaptable change processes,commensurate,with the challenges they attempt to address.,Whether considering climate change, food systems,,nuclear disarmament, or multi-stakeholder,environmental,agreements, the requirements for the design and,management of processes covered in this course,are distinct from other processes studied in the,Mediation program.,Offered in the summer term only.)
    Prerequisite(s): Complete Mediation and Applied Conflict Studies Certificate,MED-501, MED-502, MED-503, MED-504, MED-505
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 533 - Legal Issues


    Prerequisite(s): Complete Mediation and Applied Conflict Studies Certificate,MED-501, MED-502, MED-503, MED-504, MED-505
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 534 - International Conflict


    Negotiation and conflict resolution at the,international level are important diplomatic,tools to approach such globally pressing issues,as military and human security and the global,economy. Students will examine various theories,in international relations relevant to these,topics. They will also test and apply the,relevant theories through participation in the,International Communications and Online,Negotiation Simulation (ICONS), a global,,multi-institutional, online conflict simulation,hosted by the University of Maryland. The,simulation occurs the last 3 weeks of class.
    Prerequisite(s): MED-511
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 535 - Systems and Conflict


    Students will explore systems theory as a way of,thinking, learning and doing in conflict.,Utilizing diverse inputs ranging from family,systems theory to the study of simplicity,,students will be exposed to principles of,systems, whole systems-based,intervention tools, and unique experiences of,practitioners who design, develop andsupport,conflict management systems in public and private,sectors. Students will apply their learning in,tiered consultancy projects in which they will,support an organization or human network of their,choice.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete Mediation and Applied Conflict Studies Certificate,MED-501, MED-502, MED-503, MED-504, MED-505
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 536 - Technology and Mediation


    Prerequisite(s): Complete Mediation and Applied Conflict Studies Certificate,MED-501, MED-502, MED-503, MED-504, MED-505
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 537 - Thesis


    Prerequisite(s): Complete Mediation and Applied Conflict Studies Certificate,MED-501, MED-502, MED-503, MED-504, MED-505
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    MED 580 - Family and Divorce Mediation, Advanced


    This independent study is built around the,seven-day Divorce Mediation Training presented by,the New England Mediation Institute in partnership,with the MS in Mediation and Applied Conflict,Studies Program of Champlain College. This,training is designed for persons who intend to,practice divorce mediation. The workshop employs,a mixture of teaching techniques including,lecture, demonstration, case analysis, and,simulation. All participants will have,individualized observation and feedback by,experienced practicing mediators.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Program Director Required
    Credit(s): 1.5
  
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    MED 581 - Special Topics in Family Mediation


    This independent study is designed to complete,the competencies required to become a qualified,family and divorce mediator. The focus on special,topics complements the foundational training in,two previous courses-MED-524-Family Mediation and,MED-550 Independent Study: Advanced Divorce and,Family Mediation. This course employs a mixture,of teaching techniques including readings, online,coursework, in-person training, fieldwork, and,written analysis and reflection to accomplish the,learning outcomes.
    Prerequisite(s): COMPLETE MED-503, MED-511, MED-524;
    Credit(s): 1.5
  
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    MED 583 - Public Policy/Large Group Problem,Solving


    Students will learn how to design and implement,appropriate change processes for tackling big,problems. To effect change in large, open,,complex systems, process designers have to create,complex and adaptable change processes,commensurate with the challenges they attempt to,address. Whether considering climate change,,food systems, nuclear disarmament, or,multi-stakeholder environmental agreements, the,requirements for the design and management of,processes covered in this course are distinct,from other processes studied in the Mediation,program. (Offered in the summer term only.)
    Prerequisite(s): MED-512
    Credit(s): 3

Healthcare Management

  
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    HCMT 510 - Navigating the U.S. Healthcare System


    Students will learn about the U.S. health care,system, including: the federal government’s role,,health industry management, cost and quality,issues, managed care, reimbursement mechanisms,,legal and regulatory issues, profit vs. non-profit,care, the role of technology and technology,assessment. A major emphasis of the course is on,analyzing role/value/barriers to process,improvement and using information technology as a,tool. Students will relate process improvement,needs to the development, implementation and,management of information systems.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    HCMT 520 - Healthcare IT Infra.: Sys and Solutions


    Students will learn about the challenges of,managing information as a strategic resource,within healthcare organizations. They will design,information technology systems to capture,,combine, and transform information to measure,processes/outcomes of care, support collaborative,clinical decision-making, support management,decisions, empower patients, and improve health,care operations.
    Prerequisite(s): HCMT-510
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    HCMT 525 - Health Finance & Economics


    Students gain a systematic overview of the,financial operations of common healthcare,organizations, both public and private, and an,understanding of the financial components which,enable health services delivery. Students will,identify and examine key issues confronting the,financial management of healthcare systems and,provide strategies for effective management of the,challenges. Topics explored will include,traditional financial management techniques and,tools applied to healthcare settings as well as,financial management challenges unique to the,healthcare industry.
    Prerequisite(s): HCMT-510
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    HCMT 530 - Healthcare Law and Regulation


    Students learn the impact of law and ethics on the,management of healthcare in the provider setting.,Course themes include the legal barriers that,interfere with IT driven process improvement,,including exposure to malpractice, the limits on,sharing information across institutions and the,resulting limited pool of case studies and shared,experiences.
    Prerequisite(s): HCMT-510 and HCMT-520
    Credit(s): 3
 

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