Aug 05, 2020  
2013-2014 Graduate Academic Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Graduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Digital Forensic Science

  
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    DFS 510 - Scripting for Digital Forensic


    With the rapid development of new technology there,is often considerable lag between the release of,digital devices, software and operating systems,and the development of commercial tools for their,analysis. This course will equip students with the,ability to use scripting languages for the,analysis of data. Other uses for this scripting,include dealing with large volumes of data through,automation. This course will introduce students to,two different scripting languages. No prior,programming experience is required for this,course.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    DFS 520 - Operating System Analysis


    This course will examine in considerable depth how,file and operating systems determine the type of,information available to examiners. In particular,the design and behavior of these systems will be,discussed and students will be taught to recover,information from these systems at the binary,level. The features and limitations of current,forensic software tools will a lso be covered,,with particular attention paid to the techniques,by which the automated tools interpret data. A,range of operating systems will be examined,,including PC, mobile phone and embedded systems.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    DFS 530 - Incident Response and Network Forensics


    This course will prepare students for the,collection and interpretation of information from,network traffic, network devices, servers and,operating systems. The network traffic section,will cover methods of collecting and analyzing,network traffic, including TCP/lP structure and,higher level protocols. The network device section,will focus on dealing with network devices such as,routers, switches and firewalls. The incident,response section of this course will cover both,technical and procedural approaches and processes,for dealing with information technology security,incidents.
    Prerequisite(s): DFS-520
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    DFS 540 - Malware Analysis


    Students will learn different methods of malware,analysis and their respective strengths and,weaknesses. Students will gain an insight into,malware behavior, including infection vectors,,propagation and persistence mechanisms and,artifacts. Students will be taught methods of,both behavioral analysis using controlled,environments and reverse engineering. A range of,malware types including web based, Trojan,,rootkits and bots will be examined.
    Prerequisite(s): DFS-520, DFS-530
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    DFS 550 - Mobile Device Analysis


    This course will teach students to preserve and,analyze data on a range of mobile electronic,devices, examples of these include: mobile phones;,tablets; eBook readers and GPS systems. At the,conclusion of the course students will be able to,use and eva luate different methods of data,preservation, including removal and download of,data from silicon chips, software synchronization,and forensic software.Students will also be able,to develop methods of interpreting data copied,from these devices.
    Prerequisite(s): DFS-520
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    DFS 560 - Digital Forensic Triage


    As the volume of data requiring analysis continues,to grow exponentially early approaches of,examining every byte of data a re no longer,feasible. This course will examine different,approaches used to perform rapid assessment of,devices containing potential evidence. Different,models, the use of automated processes (using,scripts) and different tools will be discussed.,Particular attention will be paid to the,risks and benefits of triage type approaches.
    Prerequisite(s): DFS-510, DFS-530, DFS-550, DFS-520
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    DFS 580 - Capstone Research Thesis I


    This course will provide students with the,opportunity to integrate all disciplines and,competencies that have been learned in this,program into a single work-based project,,internship experience, or other appropriate,activity. The project will be the culmination of a,student’s studies integrated in their area of,specialization or expertise. In cooperation with,an advisor, the student will design, research, and,implement a project that is comprehensive in,nature and which addresses, to the extent,feasible, all core areas of knowledge around which,the program has been built.
    Prerequisite(s): DIM-570, and must have completed 24 credits.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    DFS 581 - Capstone Research Thesis II


    This course will provide students with the,opportunity to integrate all disciplines and,competencies that have been learned in this,program into a single work-based project,,internship experience, or other appropriate,activity. The project will be the culmination of a,student’s studies integrated in their area of,specialization or expertise. In cooperation with,an advisor, the student will design, research, and,implement a project that is comprehensive in,nature and which addresses, to the extent,feasible, all core areas of knowledge around which,the program has been built.
    Prerequisite(s): DFS-580
    Credit(s): 3

Digital Investigation Management

  
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    DIM 500 - The Practice of Digital Investigations


    This course will provide the basis for this,program of study. The course introduces the core,principles of forensic science and evidence,management. Students will examine the mission of,digital forensics from the various perspectives of,the public and private sectors, including digital,forensics in support of activities ranging from,internal corporate investigations, responses to,information security incidents, and policy,auditing to third-party investigations, criminal,investigations, and anti-terrorism information,gathering – and discussing the imperatives of,each.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    DIM 530 - Legal Principles of Dig. Investigations


    This course discusses advanced legal issues,related to the seizure of digital devices. The,course will review such laws as the Computer Fraud,and Abuse Act (CFA), Electronic Communication,Privacy Act (ECPA), and Privacy Protection Act,(PPA), with particular attention paid to evolving,decisional law surrounding the Fourth Amendment,and devices. Liaison to other agencies, law,of other countries, and international laws will,also be examined. Issues related to trial,preparation, presentation of digital evidence, use,of expert witnesses, and providing testimony will,be examined in detail. Special attention will be,paid to jurisdictional differences related to,digital investigations and cybercrime,,particularly as they relate to rules of evidence;,e.g., Federal Rules of Evidence (FRE) compared,with the different state standards based on Frye,,Daubert, or other criteria. Students for this,course will be expected to have basic familiarity,with criminal law and procedure.
    Prerequisite(s): DIM-500
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    DIM 540 - Curr Topics in Dig Investig Techniques


    This course examines advanced computer and network,forensics issues, techniques, and procedures.,Topics will include mobile device forensics (cell,phones, PDAs, MP3 players, etc.), examination of,network devices, current research topics in,digital forensics, and best practices in digital,investigations.
    Prerequisite(s): DIM-500
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    DIM 550 - Computer Forensics Lab Operation & Mgmt


    This course focuses on the management of a digital forensics laboratory. Topics will include best practices in lab operation, policies and procedures, case management, evidence management, and personnel training and certification. Issues related to workflow, information storage, technology, equipment, and security of evidence and other information will also be integrated into activities about operating a modern computer forensics lab. American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors (ASCLD) accreditation and compliance with standards such as ISO 17025 will also be discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): DIM-500.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    DIM 560 - Dig Investigations for Civil Litigation


    The course introduces principles of digital,investigations that are specific to civil,litigation. While litigation support services,typically utilize many of the same tools,,processes, and procedures as public sector,criminal investigations, private sector use of,computer forensics frequently involves issues that,the public sector does not often consider, such as,data recovery and restoration, erasure of media,,and electronic discovery. Students will examine,case studies of public sector digital,investigations to compare with private sector,methodologies.
    Prerequisite(s): DIM-500
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    DIM 570 - Research Methodology


    This course provides an overview of the research,process from the experimental, developmental, and,evaluative perspectives. Techniques for planning,and designing these different types of projects as,well as the methodologies for data collection,,evaluation, and analysis a re examined. Students,will gain an understanding of related statistical,measures. The development of conclusions based on,the data analysis in terms of predefined,hypotheses and/or project goals and objectives,will also be discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): DIM-500
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    DIM 580 - Legal Issues for Management


    This course will address the legal – and ethical,– issues related to operating public and private,sector organizations. Topics will include public,and private sector labor law, regulations and,policies governing personal information, as well,as personnel, medical, financial, and other,records (e.g., Family Educational Rights and,Privacy Act [FERPA], Gramm-Leach-Biley, Health,Insurance Portability and Accountability Act,[HIPAA], and Sarbanes-Oxley [SOX]), applying for,and administering grants from public and private,sources, and reporting and neutrality,requirements. Human resource issues related to,hiring and managing employees and consultants will,also be covered.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    DIM 590 - Integrative Capstone Project


    This course will provide students with the,opportunity to integrate all disciplines and,competencies that have been learned in this,program into a single work-based project,,internship experience, or other appropriate,activity. The project will be the culmination of a,student’s studies integrated in their area of,specialization or expertise. In cooperation with,an advisor, the student will design, research, and,implement a project that is comprehensive in,nature and which addresses, to the extent,feasible, all core areas of knowledge around which,the program has been built.
    Prerequisite(s): 36 completed credits in Digital Investigations Management
    Credit(s): 3

Education

  
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    EDU 581 - Integrating Financial Literacy Into the,Curriculum


    Students explore personal finance and financial,literacy and models for integrating this topic,into the middle and high school curriculum.,Students will explore their own understanding and,practices of personal finance. They will examine,existing curricula on the topic, review text,books, and listen to presentations from experts in,the field. In addition, participants will use the,National Standards in K-12 Personal Finance,Education to support a Classroom Action Project,focused on integrating financial literacy,knowledge and skills into the curriculum.
    Prerequisite(s): Bachelor’s Degree
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EDU 582 - Building Blocks for Literacy


    BUILDING BLOCKS FOR LITERACY provides a conceptual,understanding of the research-based components,necessary to deliver effective language and,literacy learning opportunities across education,settings. Participants will become familiar with,ongoing evidence-based practices that integrate,current research with family and professional, wisdom and values. Participants will learn how,language acquisition, phonological awareness,,shared book reading and the speech to print,connection contribute to a quality iteracy,program. There will be an in-depth study of,language pragmatics, vocabulary,comprehension and,the alphabetic principle in order to identify,early learning literacy gaps and apply strategies,to scaffold childrens learning.
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of the 12 hour online course OR,previous enrollment in a BUILDING BLOCKS FOR LITERACY® live,training or class.
    Credit(s): 3

Electronic Game Develop

  
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    EGD 5245 - Foundations of Concept Painting


    Foundations of Concept Painting is a painting class that uses the context and methods of the creation of game concept art to frame the content of the class. In this class students explore the use of color and light, through both traditional and digital painting techniques. Emphasis will be placed on painting skills, composition, and form as students work to compose original concept art.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete GDD-110 and GDD-111 OR EGD-225
    Credit(s): 3

Electronic Game Programming

  
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    EGP 5300 - Graphics/Game Engine Programming II


    This course uses the technical foundations of,knowledge attained in Graphics Programming I and,expands these skills to include new tecniques and,technologies. Students get an introduction to,advanced graphics topics including skeletal,animation, ray tracing, lighting and surfaces.,Projects are introduced to implement these,important visual effects. The knowledge obtained,will be assimilated and applied to a wide range of,usages and application. Linear Algebra algorithms,will be refreshed and/or introduced specific to,the topic at hand.
    Prerequisite(s): EGP-200
    Credit(s): 3

Emergent Media

  
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    EMM 510 - The Emergent Landscape


    Who are the thought leaders in emergent,technologies and what are they thinking? Visiting,practitioners, entrepreneurs, researchers, and,scholars will present their work and concepts in a,discussion series on current trends impacting,communications. Special attention will be given to,the origins and evolution of these ideas. Students,will market, host and review the series, leading,the forum after each presentation. As a group they,will select and organize the agenda for the,following semester?s series.
    Credit(s): 2
  
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    EMM 520 - Foundations of Digital Image Making


    What concepts guide the creation of traditional,,time-based, and interactive imagery? What is the,function of the digital toolbox? Students explore,a variety of tools for creative image making?from,drawing and painting to Photoshop, Maya, and,Flash often in unexpected combinations. Projects,serve as departure points for the discovery and,discussion of universal principles of aesthetics,and design. Special emphasis will be given to,human factors of perception and interaction and,the historical context of imagery to communicate.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 530 - Causes of Emergence: Progamming,Languages


    What is emergence and what role does code have to,play in successful applications? The student,discovers scripting and programming languages with,an emphasis on how they enabled application,development. Case studies will investigate models,such as Google, Voice Over IP, Facebook, World of,WarCraft?the languages that were chosen or,developed and why. Labs will provide a platform,for exploration of fundamental concepts such as,scripting, object oriented programming, event,driven architectures and databases.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 540 - Technology As a Disruptive Force


    In today?s society where our work, fun and,personal connections are managed and influenced by,technology, have you ever wondered how technology,will shape your future? We will explore how,technological innovation has been viewed over time,by philosophers, writers and sociologists. Which,perspectives hold true today? What about,present-day perspectives? Do you think they will,hold true tomorrow? How do we imagine that society,and ultimately our place within will be affected,day-by-day as technology continues to advance?
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 550 - Human Interfaces


    What are the physical and psychological constructs,shaping human interaction? Students will discover,fundamental interaction, communication, and design,concepts through a myriad of perspectives: dance,,music, language, crafts, architecture, and,engineering. Did mechanical and early computing,devices take these into account? Students will,explore the evolution of computer interfaces from,command line to GUI, from hypertext to hypermedia.,Insights gained will be applied to constructing,computer-mediated environments that support human,interaction.
    Prerequisite(s): EMM-520, EMM-530
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 560 - Digital Storytelling


    Whether commercially produced or user-generated,,storytelling can effectively communicate ideas and,construct meaning. Students will explore,traditional story structures and how they can find,expression in new media and varied outlets?from,news, public relations, and advertising?to,entertainment, games, and such online venues as,websites, blogs and Youtube postings. Examining,the Hero?s and the user?s journey in close detail,,students will develop an original story concept,and execute it through interactive and/or,time-based media.
    Prerequisite(s): EMM-520, EMM-530
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 570 - Experience Design: Play & Participation


    Networks and computational systems are profoundly,changing the essential human experience of,communication, participation, and play. Design is,shifting as control passes from designers to,consumers. What underlying characteristics,determine engagement and connectivity? How are,electronic games and social networks creating new,forms to entertain and shape social space?,Students examine topics that include: computer,interfaces as limitations and bridges; identity;,participatory media and social engagement;,mobility; game genres, mechanics, and ecology; and,technologies for building games and social,networks. The goal is to formulate methodologies,for designing interactive experiences that,facilitate participation.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 575 - Advanced Seminar


    Constant evolution defmes the Emergent Media,Landscape. What are the latest technologies and,tools influencing thought, behaviors, and shaping,communication? In this class students embrace and,anticipate change, acquire skills and knowledge,,and develop cutting edge work by conceiving and,producing projects balancing technical and,esthetics requirements of an emergent,artistic practice.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete 24 EMM credits.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 580 - Collaborative Production


    In this first of three collaborative production,experiences, students identify their strengths,,areas for growth, and preferred focuses in media,production. With these in mind, they are,selectively chosen to collaborate with faculty,,student production teams, and sponsors on Emergent,Media Center supported projects. The student,participates in a collaborative process in a,professional level project. These collaborative,project experiences are intended to inform, but,not necessarily contribute to the student?s final,thesis project.,What is the spirit and goal of the entrepreneur in,emergent media? Focusing on the business goals of,a project at the Emergent Media Center, the,student will focus on needs analysis, cost,,capacity, value, budget implications, project,planning, iteration, production, and collaboration,in an applied context. The full semester project,engagement will emphasize the convergence of,business goals, end-user needs, technology, and,collaborative leadership.
    Prerequisite(s): EMM-520, EMM-530
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 581 - Collaborative Production Project II


    The consumer drives emergent media. To create,innovation in this landscape, design and,communication needs to begin with an understanding,of the end-user. Focusing on the goals of a,project at the Emergent Media Center, students,will conduct qualitative and quantitative research,into users’ behaviors, attitudes and expectations.,Likewise, they will conduct secondary research,into published literature and other sources.,Working with the project team this information,will guide the design, production, and testing,processes.
    Prerequisite(s): EMM-580
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 582 - Collaborative Production Project III


    The goals of design and engineering on any,project can easily get out of sync. Team members,may have differing interpretations of what they,are working toward. As the keeper of the,project’s vision, the creative director must,monitor and manage all facets of production to,ensure the end product is of the highest,aesthetic and technical standards. Students will,experience this role from all sides of the,production team as they guide the design,,production, and testing processes.
    Prerequisite(s): EMM-581
    Credit(s): 4
  
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    EMM 585 - Media for Social Innovation


    How does media impact interaction? Can,computational products integrate with the,physical world to create meaning and connection?,Assessing this information, students work,collaboratively to propose innovative,human-centric solutions that are responsive to,community. In this first of two collaborative,production experiences, students identify their,strengths, areas for growth, and media production,focus. With these in mind, students form teams,and work on a professional level project,supported by the Emergent Media Center.
    Prerequisite(s): EMM-580
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 590 - People, Place & Community


    Application and integration of technology in the,real world varies from community to community-from,the digital display at the gas station to the,neighborhood Facebook group. How does,computational media impact face-to-face,interaction? How can it improve outreach for,groups such as small businesses and non-profits?,How can we design interfaces that integrate with,the physical world to create meaning and,connection? The student will select a local,community, research the challenges facing it, and,the local technology and connectivity constraints.,Assessing this information, the student will,propose an emergent media solution that is,human-centeric and responsive to community.
    Prerequisite(s): EMM-550
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 591 - Collaborative Production


    Producing emergent media forms draws upon the,skill sets of a diverse group of talented people.,In this final collaborative studio students learn,to facilitate, manage and implement the creative,process. They will take on the roles and,responsibilities associated with project leads,and project managers, effectively communicating,with partners, sponsors and the student,production teams. In these roles students become,key decision makers and strengthen abilities in,describing and implementing strategic creative,and production decisions.
    Prerequisite(s): EMM-585
    Credit(s): 6
  
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    EMM 595 - Managing Online Communities


    Organizations must carefully manage their online,communities. An online community manager must be a,community advocate and brand evangelist who has,savvy communication skills, can create content on,multiple platforms, gather community input and,measure success. Students will learn how to manage,multiple online communities for a brand. Current,case studies along with a hands-on project with a,business will be used. Students will be required,to sign up for multiple online accounts on a,variety of services.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 600 - Puzzles and Prototypes


    Much like a traditional artist creates quick,sketches that influence the masterpiece, students,will generate rapid prototypes to explore,interactive solutions and games. Working,individually or in teams they will create weekly,solutions or iterations to design puzzles posed by,current media trends and news events. Prototyping,activities will rely on research and testing in,the design process. Various methods covered will,include paper prototyping, mind mapping,,participatory design, mini-game format, agile,development, etc. Evaluating pros and cons of,methods and results, students will learn to match,method to scope and complexity of a design,problem.
    Prerequisite(s): EMM-550
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 610 - Our Human Experience: Through the Lense,Of Neuroscience, Education and Business


    What is identity, how do we learn, what influences,decision-making and emotional responses? The,answers to these questions pose new insights that,can impact the media design. Ongoing research in,neuroscience and changing theories in education,and business bring new understandings of what,guides human behavior. Students examine the impact,of mass communications and newer concepts of,online media?such as the collapse of distance,,global connectivity, and information delivered in,short bursts?on identity and how we process,information.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 620 - Integrative Thesis Project I


    Innovation doesn’t spring from a void. Ideas are,iterative, changing and emerging over time. In,this first of two independent studios, the student,develops a vision by researching a pertinent,problem addressable through emergent toolsets and,presenting it to the community for ongoing,feedback. Through systematic examination, the,student will consider social impacts; develop a,project plan; establish goals and objectives;,collect and analyze information; and prepare and,deliver a conceptual prototype agreed upon by the,student and faculty advisor.
    Prerequisite(s): 42 completed EMM credits
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 621 - Integrative Thesis Project II


    This phase of the integrative thesis project will,see the conceptual prototype develop through,iterations that apply learned production and,testing processes and community feedback.,Students will consider their own creative,processes and the need for and means to,incorporate creative partnerships into their,project development. While the thesis project may,not be fully realized, student thinking will be,refined as the project develops into a more,tangible form that demonstrates the highest,standards of technical and aesthetic quality.
    Prerequisite(s): EMM-620
    Credit(s): 6
  
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    EMM 622 - Integrative Thesis Process


    The student shall work towards iteratively,define, develop and document the theoretical,constructs underlying their cumulative master’s,body of work. Through a structured series of,readings, presentations, and discussions students,will discuss and receive feedback from the MFA,faculty and student community about the,influences and assumptions underlying their,individual projects. This experience is,concurrent with Thesis Project II allowing the,students to produce a fully articulated body or,work and written thesis that includes the central,question, project description, and related,documentation.
    Prerequisite(s): EMM-620
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5100 - Interaction Design I


    What makes an interface seem intuitive and easy to,use? How do graphics and their presentation,facilitate desired interactions? In this course,we’ll examine the ways in which interfaces help or,hinder an audience’s ability to move through,information or experience a story along multiple,paths. Using industry standard software tools for,the creation of interactive media, we’ll explore,interactivity from simple buttons to hyper-media.,Along the way we’ll identify the core principles,of interactivity at work in creative expressions,as diverse as: web-design, games, hyper-text,novels, non-linear animation and film, and,installation art.
    Prerequisite(s): GDD-110 OR GDD-111
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5110 - Introduction to Game Design


    What’s the difference between an FPS and an RPG?,Are discovery and exploration important in every,style of game, or can they detract from a cool,game concept? We answer these questions by,examining genres in games and analyzing some of,the gameplay styles associated with them.,Then, once we’ve discovered strengths and ,weaknesses inherent to particular game styles,,we’ll develop skills necessary to formulate and,evauluate our own original gameplay ideas.
    Prerequisite(s): GDES.BS students only, or by permission of CCM Division Dean
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5115 - The Digital Image


    With the advent of digital technology, the,pleasure of taking and viewing digital photographs,and video clips is now commonplace. The,professional designer, however, must be able to,control this technology to a much greater degree,than does the layperson, and to that end this,course introduces you to the finer points of,planning, capturing, transferring, modifying, and,formatting your still and video imagery for use in,successful graphic design projects. While students,may borrow both digital still- and video-cameras,from the College free of charge, owning a good SLR,digital camera would be very helpful; ask the,instructor for recommendations.,,
    Prerequisite(s): GDD-110 (was MMG-101) or GDD-111 (was MMG-102)
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5115A - Photography, Introduction to


    Students will learn the components of the 35mm,camera; the interrelationship of ASA, aperture,,and shutter speed; and film types and their,applications. Elements of composition, light and,aesthetic values are covered. The darkroom and,printing process are included in the course,format. Practical and professional applications of,photography also are examined. Students must,provide a 35mm SLR camera.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5115GA - Introduction to Game Art and Animation


    Introduction to Game Art and Animation is an,exploration of the world of game art, the,technologies in use and what it takes to become a,game artist. Students study the history,,aesthetics, technology, practices and workflow,used in all facets of game art creation. This,class prepares Game Art and Animation students for,their academic professional program and the game,industry.
    Prerequisite(s): GAME ART & ANIMATION MAJORS ONLY
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5120 - Entrepreneurship


    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5120A - Introduction to Mobile Development


    Students will gain a foundational understanding of,the current field of mobile computing in this,course. A hands on survey of current mobile,platforms will give students a strong insight into,what it means to work with mobile software. Case,studies of how Mobile Computing has invigorated,social networks, re-writtten business models, and,connected people across the far reaches of the,globe will be addressed in this course.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5125 - Film Appreciation


    Students learn to appreciate films through the,critical analysis of various elements of,mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing and sound.,The course introduces the conventions of classical,Hollywood cinema, considers the work of one major,director (auteur), and surveys selected,international and independent films. Students view,and discuss films each week.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5125W - Web Development


    Introduction to Web Development using standard,markup languages and formatting methods.,Students will become familiar with various,methods and tools for development.,The course introduces students to elements of,effective web applications including graphics,,layout, and interactivity. Students will also,learn the basics of developing social networking,web sites and incorporating third party e-commerce,applications into their Web sites.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5130 - Audio Production


    This hands-on production course introduces audio,techniques, covering the basics of writing,,producing, and engineering productions for audio,production. Students write, produce and perform a,variety of programs including news, interviews,,commercials, dramas and documentaries. Besides,traditional analog recording techniques, students,gain a solid understanding of digital audio,recording and editing techniques for persuasion,,information and entertainment.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5135 - Computer Theory, Introduction


    This course gives the student an introduction to,the broad discipline of computer science and,software engineering. It covers topics essential,to creating a foundation of knowledge before,moving on to more advanced courses. Topics include,an introduction to computer architecture,,introduction to programming logic and program,design using C++, IEEE floating point,representation, integer representation, two’s,compliment, and object-oriented principles.,Students must have an understanding of algebraic,problem solving.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5140 - Introduction to Programming


    Students will learn the history and basis of,computing as well as the fundamentals of,programming. Topics include: the history of,computing, binary and hexadecimal number systems,and mathematics, Boolean logic, algorithm design,and implementation and modern computer,organization. Programming topics include: memory,and variables, mathematical operations, basic file,I/O, decision making, repetitions and subroutine.
    Prerequisite(s): Corequisite of MTH-230
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5200 - Design and Communication


    One of the most exciting aspects of the graphic,designer’s work is to create symbols and images,,which not only communicate messages, but also,engender an aesthetic response for a viewer. In,this course you will tackle basic symbol-making,and message-communication challenges, practicing,your recently gained knowledge of, and skills in,,perspective drawing, formal two-dimensional,design, tonality, color theory, and digital,art-making to solve visual communication,challenges through a genuinely personal creative,process. Basic art supplies are required.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5200A - Wireless Application Design and,Development


    Designing applications for mobile devices is,considerably different than for desktop computers.,Screen size and system resources are limited and,users interact differently with the devices. This,course provides an overview of information,architectures available for a range of wireless,devices. Special emphasis will be placed on the,implications of platform fragmentation on the,design and development of applications among a,wide variety of wireless devices. In a hands-on,project students will design and develop a web,application for use on both desktop and mobile,computers.
    Prerequisite(s): WEBD-125, CMIT-200
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5202 - Game Technology I


    Game designers need an essential skill set that,allows them to realize their concepts through,working prototypes. In Game Technology I students,learn how to develop and manipulate game mechanics,and environments through visual and traditional,scripting tools. This class is the first in a,series that supports skills needed for level,editing and design, prototyping, and working in,game engines.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5203 - Form in Motion


    Form in Motion introduces the principles of,motion graphic design through applied practice.,The focus will be on the relationship between,typographic principles and animation,fundamentals. Students synthesize the language of,motion with elements of narrative structure to,realize kinetic solutions. In addition to,exploring systems and the synthesis of text and,image, the course also provides knowledge and,skills in creative ideation in motion.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete GDD-110 or GDD-111 and complete GDD-201
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5206 - Web Design I


    Students will explore various aspects of basic web,page organization, design, and,construction. The web page will be considered as a,visual challenge - exploiting a,relatively restrictive format to maximize visual,impact and effective communication,,and organizing the content into an easily,navigable hierarchy. Basic HTML authoring,and digital kinetics will be introduced, and,visual principles and digital artwork skills,from earlier coursework will be reinforced through,introductory web page projects.
    Prerequisite(s): GDD-110 (was MMG-101) or GDD-111 (was MMG-102) or permission,of the program director.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5215 - 3D Art, Introduction to


    From storyboard to moving pictures - how do Pixar,and ILM do it? An introduction to 3-dimensional,computer animation gives the advanced student a,hands-on appreciation for what it takes to work in,the animation industry. Basic principles of 3D,modeling, lighting and movement will be explored.,This studio class relies on the student’s drive to,experiment and dive into extremely complex,computer programs. A 3D animated “short”,comprising of student created models, environments,and textures will be the culminating outcome of,the course.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5215W - Web Site Design


    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5220 - Game Production I


    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5225 - Web Page Development II - CSS and XML


    Expand the horizons of the web page to fully,utilize all the functionality provided by the,browser. This course will allow students to,develop and implement complex page designs.,Students will learn how to design a site to meet,the communications needs of the client. Covering,designing for usability and aesthetics and,advanced HTML, this course will introduce DHTML,,SHTML and XML to allow students to fully,understand the separation of design, structure and,content in web page development.
    Prerequisite(s): WEBD-125
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5225GD - Drawing for Game Development


    Drawing for Game Development is your opportunity,to discover the magic of absorbing environments,and convincing figures by applying the time tested,principles of perspective, anatomy, light and,composition to the challenge of creating effective,art for games. The result will be the disciplined,drawing skills that you will need to realize the,dynamic characters and environments of your,imagination.
    Prerequisite(s): ART-135
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5230 - Audio & Video Digital Editing


    Through a combination of classroom instruction and,project-based work in the Multimedia and Video,labs, students will develop skills in audio and,video recording, digitizing, producing and editing,for implementation in television, radio and,multimedia.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5230GD - Level Design


    A level designer controls moment by moment what a,player sees, hears and feels during the game,experience. Following the broader direction of the,game designer, the level designer creates the,setting and crafts the challenges for each,individual level. The style and content of,individual game levels must establish the right,mood, support the anticipated functionality,,advance the storyline, and satisfy the,idiosyncratic requirements of the players.,Building on the design foundation of Conceptual,Design, this course teaches students how to,successfully design, draft, document, and,implement successful game levels.
    Prerequisite(s): EGD-210 or EGD-212
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5240 - Advanced Programming


    This course continues the material from,Introduction to Programming that includes array,,structure and dynamic memory allocation. Then, the,focus of this course moves toward Object-Oriented,Programming (OOP) that includes topics such as,objects, classes, encapsulation, abstraction,,modularity, inheritance, and polymorphism.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete CSI-140 with a minimum grade of C.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5245 - The Art and Science of Leadership


    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5245G - Foundations of Concept Painting


    To harness the power of the visual, the successful,concept artist must couple a balanced composition,of light, form, space, and axes of action with,narrative. In this course you will learn to tell,the engaging stories of your imagination by,exercising the fundamentals of digital painting.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete GDD-110 and GDD-111 OR EGD-225
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5250 - Introduction to Stop Motion Animation


    This course guides students through the active,creation of several individual stop motion,animation projects while developing their,knowledge and expertise in traditional stop motion,animation techniques using modern computing,technology. Students present their developing,ideas and original projects for critical,assessment. Students are also exposed to the rich,history and evolution of stop motion animation.
    Prerequisite(s): DFM-230 or permission of Program Director
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5270 - Intercultural Communication


    This course builds on COM 130, but with an,emphasis on how to develop skills for,communicating competently in an increasingly,diverse society. Students will explore how culture,is communicated verbally and non-verbally, and how,to interpret and understand culturally-specific,communicative practices. They will also learn how,to establish, develop and manage relationships,with culturally different peoples, and how to,recognize and overcome cultural stereotypes and,prejudices.
    Prerequisite(s): Must have completed one of the following: COM-100, COM-130,,or 30 credits.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5280 - Innovation II: Open Source Software Dev


    Students will explore the history, philosophy,,mechanics, and practices of the,open source movement. Students will research some,of the most prevalent,and cutting- edge open source technologies, and,gain experience working,with the tools and techniques used in open source,software development.
    Prerequisite(s): CSI-180
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5282 - Synthesis and Sound Design


    After a brief history of the development of,electronic synthesis, students will delve into,creating sounds,using current industry standard synthesizers.,Types of synthesis will include virtual analog,,frequency,modulation and physical modeling. Digital audio,workstations will be used to record and organize,the,sounds. The vast array of electronic effects in,Logic will also be explored. Students will gain a,functional,knowledge of not only synthesis, but also powerful,electronic effect and sequencing options.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5300 - Game Technology II


    Acquire the integration skills needed to,successfully build a 3D game. In Game Engine I we,explore both the technical construction and,practical design of games in a 3D game engine.,The technical skills required to use the game,engine software are combined with knowing how and,when to use “spaces” in a level, construct an,interface, establish moods, and direct a player’s,attention through sound effects, lighting, camera,angles, and text to create a complete working,game.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5301 - Typography II


    Having explored the history and basic use of,letterforms, you can now delve deeper into various,aspects of the written word, typography, and its,relation to imagery. In this course you will,approach design solutions using solely typographic,form and together with images. From font usage, to,paragraph and page structure, students explore how,typographic form interacts with literary content,,and how the current critical milieu influences,typographic thinking. Specific technical and/or,aesthetic considerations necessary in composing,type for digital delivery are considered, and,students will also try their hand at digital font,design.
    Prerequisite(s): GDD-201
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5302 - Graphic Design/Objects&spaces


    Graphic design for packages, products, exhibits,,and architectural signs comprise a significant,portion of professional design practice. In this,course, students are learn how to conceptualize,and mock-up designs for three-dimensional objects,and spaces, and to create the artwork ready for,production of full-scale graphics. Students,practice visualizing graphical elements in three,dimensions, controlling digital artwork to,precise,specifications and tolerances, and communicating,with architects and production personnel in,various production areas. Students are required,to,have basic art supplies, and to purchase limited,quantities of model-building materials.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5303 - Illustration, Introduction to


    Generating effective imagery remains a vital skill,for today’s visual communicators. In this course,students will be free to work digitally and/or in,traditional media to solve real world illustration,problems including advertising, editorial,,sequential, spots and more. Through discussion,and group critiques students will discover,illustration theory. How do value, color, and form,evoke mood in illustration? How can composing in,no more than two elements lend meaning and weight?,What is the axis of action in a picture and why is,it important? These are just a few of the,questions that will be explored through,instruction, slides, examples, demonstrations and,hands-on problem solving. Students will,investigate the history and the future of the,field of illustration and its application in,sound, motion and interactivity.
    Prerequisite(s): ART-110, GDD-110 (was MMG-101), GDD-211 MMG-212
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5306 - Web Design II


    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5311 - Digital 2D Motion Graphics


    This course will focus on developing the skills,needed to create successful 2D animations. These,include brainstorming, scripting, storyboarding,,building animatics, sound design and the use of,proper output methods and aspect ratios.
    Prerequisite(s): GDD-212 (was MMG-210)
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5335 - 3D Animation,Animation & Special Effects, Advanced


    This course focuses on the aesthetics of motion,with emphasis on the principles of traditional,animation. Students begin with the basics of,putting 3D models in motion and work through the,tools, techniques, and principles required to,animate fully articulated characters using,skeletal deformation and control rigs. This course,emphasizes the realization of the principles of,animation through group critique.
    Prerequisite(s): EGD-235
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5339 - Painting Other Worlds


    PAINT OTHER WORLDS OTHER WAYS. Learn to create,21st Century images from your mind’s eye, based,on concepts and techniques of the early 20th,Century avant-garde movements. Develop new,,stylized paintings through the study of rare,,visually stunning, non-traditional masterworks.,The modernist paintings that serve as,inspirational material for this course do not,rely on the academic draftsmanship or classical,methods mastered (but rejected) by their,creators. Highly skilled Game Art students will,be provided with fresh approaches to developing,their own universes. Students with less artistic,experience will succeed by expressing their own,ideas, visions, and feelings on canvas.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5340 - Film Scoring


    This course will take students through the,exciting process of creating music for film.,First discussing the history of music in film, ,and the production process, the course will then,dive into the actual process of writing cues for,film, including spotting, syncing to picture,,understanding visual sequences and dramatic,intent. Students will be challenged to write cues,for a variety of visual sequences in different,tempos and moods.,
    Prerequisite(s): Complete DFM-120 or by permission of Dean.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5340GD - Game Systems and Experience Design


    At the core of every game experience are the,systems that generate that experience. In this,advanced game design course, we will examine a,full spectrum of game experiences and deconstruct,their systems. We will look at the many facets of,creating a player-centric game experience from the,cultural significance of games and play to,conceptualizing and proving concepts for a broad,range of game media target markets and purposes.
    Prerequisite(s): EGD-110,Only Game majors may enroll in this course.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5350 - Digital Marketing


    Students will learn how digital tools and multiple,platforms have created a wide range of marketing,options for organizations. Theoretical strategy,and hands-on tactics will illustrate the strategic,reasons for utilizing digital marketing and how to,use the tools most effectively. Student teams will,conduct a digital marketing audit and,recommendation plan for local businesses as a key,component of this class. Students will register,for and utilize advanced online marketing tools.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete 30 credits and either BUS-120 or MKT-110.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5350A - Interaction Design Production


    Are you interested in making the next big thing,in interactivity? How do you assemble and work in,a team to design, research, test, develop and,market digital experiences? Whether you’re,creating a game, website, mobile application,,virtual space, or augmented reality experience,,there are design, research and development,methodologies to help shape the process of,realizing these products. Over the,course of the semester we will take such a,product from conceptual development through to,launch.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5351 - Public Art, Private Practices


    What do you want to see in the spaces you,inhabit? We will look at public art from ancient,propaganda and celestial calendar markers to the,role of public art today, examining how art goes,beyond the monument to spark public conversation.,Traditional ways of making art will be explored,along with new genres such as participatory,projects and interactive media. Issues such as,permanent versus ephemeral, cultural sensitivity,,accessibility and the notion of authorship and,ownership, of ‘public’ versus ‘private’ will be,analyzed. Each student will research current and,historical public projects and create their own,projects, connecting areas of inquiry to our,current community.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete CRE-200 OR 57 credits.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5355 - Marketing Research


    In this course, students will learn how to conduct,in-depth interviews, run focus groups, and design,surveys. Methods for measurement and evaluation,will also be studied and applied. Quantitative and,qualitative data analysis will be highlighted with,special attention paid to the implementation of,appropriate statistical analyses. Students,enrolled in this coirrse will also complete a,semester-long research project.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH-180; and either BUS-120 or MKT-110.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5365 - Entrepreneurship: Creating New Ventures


    Provides a discussion and immersion into the,concepts of entrepreneurship as a career option.,From ideation, innovation, and opportunity,recognition through industry research and,competitive analysis, students formulate a vision,of their venture and evaluate it against the,resources and constraints of the business,environment for feasibility and sustainability.,Students create a comprehensive business plan on a,venture of their choosing.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete one of the following:BUS-120, MGT-100 or MGT-210;,Complete 60 credits.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5370 - Usability and Design


    Web sites have unique usability issues. Users are,drawn from a widely disparate, critical population,and satisfaction has to occur with 7 seconds.,Building usable, effective web sites that are,human-centered and attractive requires an,innovative approach coupled with a stable and,usable toolset. This course teaches students about,the issues faced by web designers and the main,tools available for building in usability as well,as assessing it. The issues surrounding the web as,a public space for disabled access is also,addressed.
    Prerequisite(s): WEB-320 OR SWE-130
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5380B - Advanced Seminar: Game Design


    Advanced Seminars vary in topic and are designed,to provide the advanced student with time for,personal development of their portfolio in the,area of their specialty. Examples of projects,include:,Designing and documenting an original game,concept.,Designing, documenting, and constructing a series,of level mods.,Conceptualizing and documenting an original game,narrative.,Designing and constructing a series of original,game models.,Designing, constructing, rigging, and animating,one or more original 3D characters.,Conceptualizing and creating a character bible.,Students propose and create a production schedule,for their semester projects, and present them in a,public showing at completion of the course. See,current semester course offerings for available,topics.
    Prerequisite(s): Game Art and Animation or Game Design majors only. Must,complete 60 credits and have approval of program director,before taking this course.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5390 - Advanced Business Internship


    This is a fourth-year business course designed for,Business and e-Business & Commerce majors; it is a,capstone learning experience which should be taken,in the student’s final semester. This course,offers students an opportunity to participate in,an intensive, hands-on management-level work,experience in a business or not-for-profit setting,that complements individual career aspirations.,After finding an appropriate internship site,,student interns will apply their business skills,in a project-based context to help the,organization address a problem or capitalize on an,opportunity. In addition to the workplace,projects, interns will research current,information pertaining to their projects, conduct,”site analysis” evaluations, analyze “critical,incidents,” submit final written reports and,present oral summaries to their peers. Upon,completion of this course students should have,gained valuable business experiences, acquired,strong insights into an industry and an,organization and made career-building contacts.
    Prerequisite(s): Must have completed at least 18 credits of business,requirements or have permission of the program director.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5400 - Projects in Graphic Design


    Your learning and preparation through projects,couched within specific lessons now transform into,a truly personal graphic design practice as you,engage various self-directed projects?from logos,and stationery, to publications, to packages, to,architectural signs and trade show displays. This,course guides you through the conceptualization,,design, and production to produce a body of work,ready for presentation in your professional,portfolio. (Consult with your advisor to choose,the section most appropriate to your elective,track.) Basic art supplies will be required.
    Prerequisite(s): MMGD or GDDM majors only,Must complete 84 credits before taking this course.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5401 - Senior Portfolio in Graphic Design


    In preparation for getting your dream job, this,course will guide you through the process of,finalizing, organizing and assembling your graphic,design projects into an engaging portfolio which,represents you as a designer, as a thinker, and as,a person. A great portfolio requires deliberation,and effort, and needs to be supported by a,distinctive graphic presentation, resum and job,search strategy; all aspects are covered in this,course. Your portfolio will respond to your,emphasis, from traditional book forms to,interactive DVD and/or web pages. Purchase of,portfolio materials will be necessary, and,students will need basic art supplies.
    Prerequisite(s): Graphic Design and Digital Media or Multimedia & Graphic,Design students only.,Must complete 100 credits before taking this course.
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5410 - AI For Games


    This course provides a technical introduction to,the core concepts of artifical intelligence (AI).,Students will be introduced to the history of AI,,agents (agent architecture and multi-agent,behavior), search (search space, uninformed and,informed search, constraint satisfaction, game,playing), knowledge representation (logical,encoding of domain knowledge, logical reeasoning,systems), planning (search over plan space,,partial-order planning, practical planning),,uncertainty and probability, learning (inductive,learning, linear separators, decision trees,,boosting, reinforcement learning), and perception,and cognition (natural language, machine vision,,robotics).
    Credit(s): 3
  
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    EMM 5410A - Advanced Advertising


    Examples of many different types of successful and,unsuccessful advertising campaigns throughout,history will be studied. Students will plan,,research and implement an advertising campaign,from scratch that will encompass different media,,reach a specific audience and make an impact. Both,students and the instructor(s) will evaluate,project success. Guest speakers from the,Advertising field will provide insight into,current best practices. Portfolios of work will be,developed to enable students to showcase their,work.
    Prerequisite(s): MKT-110 MKT-130,Must complete 90 credits before taking this course.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5420 - Senior Production


    What will games be like in the future? How might,technological advancements, governmental,regulations, and unforeseen economic,social,,or cultural factors impact the way games are made?,This advanced seminar course helps students answer,those questions, even as it picks up where EGD 400,(Senior Team Project I) left off–by affording,students the opportunity to collaboratively bring,the original game concepts developed in that,prerequisite class into fully realized, marketable,game products.
    Prerequisite(s): EGD-400 or CCC-410,Only Game majors may enroll in this course.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5440 - Graphic Des. Business Practice


    Whether you plan to start your own graphic design,business or to work for an established studio,,this course will familiarize you with business,information specific to the graphic design office,,and with best practices in managing design,projects from inception to production. Topics,include basic accounting and reporting procedures,,establishing and maintaining business,relationships, and documenting material and,information pertinent to project supervision.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5570 - Intermediate Type


    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    EMM 5582 - Sequential Art


    Learn techniques needed to effectively combine,words with pictures in the creation of graphic,novels, comic strips and storyboards. Students,will learn how to render human and animal,figures, and the methods of composition that best,serve the storytelling. The media used will be,manual (pencil, paper, ruler, triangle, pen and,ink, and watercolors), but we will cover,Photoshop’s and Adobe Illustrator’s useful tools,for typography and coloring. The written element,will focus on developing concise dialogue and,nimble pacing.
    Prerequisite(s): 27 Completed Credits AND one of the following courses:,ART-110, ART-135, or GDD-111,,Enrollment could also be granted by permission of the CCM,Dean.
    Credit(s): 3

Graduate Early Education

  
  •  

    GEE 501 - Early Childhood and Play: From Theory to,To Practice


    Students explore the relationship between young,children’s play and development. They do close,reading of the work of classic educational,theorists such as Piaget and Vygotsky as well as,contemporary theorists like Elkind and Katz.,Students examine the link between theory and,practice and take part in thoughtful reflection on,their personal teaching and leadership practices.
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    GEE 502 - Creating Constructive Environments


    Students focus on the importance of the learning,environment in the early childhood setting. They,analyze the work of classic educational theorists,such as Piaget, Erickson, Montessori, and Vygotsky,and explore how their theories impact the,environment. Students analyze the elements of a,constructive environment: the physical,environment,the class as a community, the outdoors,as curriculum, and the need for recess in the K-3,learning environment.
    Prerequisite(s): GEE-501
    Credit(s): 3
  
  •  

    GEE 503 - Leadership,mentoring and Quality


    Students examine a variety of leadership models,and analyze the nuances between leadership and,mentoring, and by the end of the course define,their own roles as early childhood leaders and,mentors. In addition, students focus on the,definitions of quality and high quality in the,early childhood context and their implications for,teaching,learning, and program development.
    Credit(s): 3
 

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