Feb 23, 2020  
2017-2018 Undergraduate College Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Science

  
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    SCI 115 - Human Biology, Introduction to


    Explanation of the basic principles of medically oriented human biology. The course investigates basic biology, cell biology and biochemistry as they pertain to human body systems and diseases such as AIDS, cancer, and cardiovascular disease as well as other selected topics. Current research topics are also discussed. Laboratory sessions are designed to reinforce, by a hands-on approach, the principles discussed in lecture. Course includes two laboratory hours per week.
    Credits: 4
    ITS
  
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    SCI 115L - Biology Lab


    See SCI-115 course description
    Credits: 0
    ITS
  
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    SCI 130 - General Chemistry I


    This course develops chemistry concepts in the greater framework of societal and technological issues, such as pollution and energy resources. As a student, you will have at your disposal a variety of information sources (textbook, web resources) to sharpen your observation techniques and to help you understand the many chemical and physical laws behind the technologies you will consider. Both class discussion and laboratory experimentation are designed to help you learn apply, and experience chemistry as a practical science that is relevant to everyday life. Topics studied include air and water pollution, global warming, and acid rain. These topics will each underscore a more classical chemistry topic such as the periodic table, the makeup and behavior of atoms and molecules, chemical bonding, chemical equations, and stoichiometry, chemical reactions and changes of state. Course includes two laboratory hours per week.
    Credits: 4
    ITS
  
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    SCI 130L - General Chemistry I Lab


    Credits: 0
    ITS
  
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    SCI 140 - Nutrition & Fitness, Biology of


    Introduces students to the biochemistry and physiology of nutrition and exercise. Emphasis will be placed on human body systems, such as musculoskeletal, digestive, respiratory and circulatory, and their relationship to nutrition and fitness. Students will also study the biochemistry of energy conversion as it relates to exercise physiology. Laboratory sessions are designed to reinforce, by a hands-on approach the principles discussed in lecture. Course includes two laboratory hours per week.
    Credits: 4
    ITS
  
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    SCI 140L - Nutrition & Fitness Lab


    See BIO 140 course description.
    Credits: 0
    ITS
  
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    SCI 150 - Environmental Earth Sciences


    Introduces the student to the main elements of the earth systems, and analyzes the effects of human interactions with these systems. Emphasis will be given to surface phenomena and to the application of the scientific method to current environmental issues. Course includes two laboratory hours per week.
    Prerequisites: Must register for SCI-150L (the lab portion of the course).
    Credits: 4
    ITS
  
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    SCI 150L - Environmental Earth Sciences Lab


    See SCI 150 Course Description.
    Prerequisites: Must take the corequisite lecture portion of the course: SCI-150.
    Credits: 0
    ITS
  
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    SCI 155 - Global Environmental Earth Science


    Global Environmental Earth Science is a multi-disciplinary course in which students will explore a wide variety of topics including biodiversity, soil, water, forestry, climate change, alternative energy and others. This course is both timely and relevant to the society and world in which Champlain College students live. The scientific basis of environmental topics will be studied in order to more fully understand the current environmental issues of our times. Active inquiry and discussion of environmental issues will be complemented by fieldwork and hands-on experiments.
    Credits: 4
    ITS
  
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    SCI 155L - Global Envir. Earth Sci. Lab


    Credits: 0
    ITS
  
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    SCI 170 - Forensic Science, Introduction to


    Students learn the biology, genetics, chemistry and physics involved in the forensic investigation of crimes. A wide range of topics are studied including DNA, entomology, fingerprinting, trace evidence, serology (blood, saliva, and semen) blood spatter, and chemical analysis of drugs alcohol, and other compounds. Students apply their new knowledge of forensic science through the use of case studies and laboratories. This course includes two laboratory hours per week.
    Prerequisites: If you have taken FOR-110 you may not take this lab science course.
    Credits: 4
    ITS
  
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    SCI 170L - Intro to Forensic Science Lab


    See SCI-170
    Credits: 0
    ITS
  
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    SCI 210 - Foundations of Ecology: an Exploration of the Local Bioregion


    Students examine the processes influencing the distribution and abundance of organisms, the interactions among organisms, and the interactions between organisms and the transformation and flux of energy and matter through the lens of the local bioregion. Students explore the six ecological levels and analyze the effect of human interactions with these systems. Emphasis will be placed on interdependent relationships between and within ecological communities. This course includes two laboratory hours per week.
    Prerequisites: SCI-150
    Credits: 4
    ITS
  
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    SCI 220 - Anatomy & Physiology I


    The study of mammalian body structures, their functions and the mechanisms involved in these functions, and their interrelations in maintaining homeostasis. Course includes two laboratory hours a week. (Fall only)
    Prerequisites: Radiography majors only, or permission of ITS Department Chair, or Office of the Dean of the CPS Division
    Credits: 4
    ITS
  
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    SCI 220L - Anatomy & Physiology I Lab


    See SCI-220 course description.
    Credits: 0
    ITS
  
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    SCI 225 - Anatomy & Physiology II


    Students will use the knowledge obtained in SCI-220 as a foundation to study the individual systems of the body as well as show the systems work together in the human organism. The cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal excretory, and endocrine systems are studied individually; the coordination of these systems by the central nervous system completes the course. Emphasis in placed on normal physiology, but enough pathology is introduced to give an appreciation of the disease process. Two hours per week of laboratory involve cat dissection, as well as student electrocardiograms, blood pressures and urinalysis. (Spring Only)
    Prerequisites: SCI-220 Radiography majors only, or permission of ITS Department Chair or Office of the Dean of the CPS Division
    Credits: 4
    ITS
  
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    SCI 225L - Anatomy & Physiology II Lab


    See SCI-225 course description.
    Credits: 0
    ITS
  
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    SCI 250 - Physics I


    This physics course is an algebra based investigation of classical Newtonian mechanics. As almost everything we encounter or do on a daily basis involves physics, whether it is obvious or not, this course is particularly useful for any future career. Many of the examples studied are very practical, and theory is used as an adjunct to the real-world problems investigated. Topics include measurement and error, vector quantities translational and rotational motion, Newton?s laws, work energy and power, and properties of materials. Laboratory sessions are designed to re-enforce material presented in class as well as introduce students to laboratory procedures and the scientific method. In addition to Newtonian mechanics, we will investigate basic electronics and robotics and their connection to physics
    Prerequisites: MTH-125 or MTH-230
    Credits: 4
    ITS
  
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    SCI 250L - Physics I Lab


    See SCI-250 course description
    Credits: 0
    ITS
  
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    SCI 310 - Advanced Environmental Earth Science


    Advanced Environmental Earth Science is an upper-level course designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of environmental systems, including primary research literature research design and formal scientific report writing. Topics include: complex systems climate change, climate models, quantification of sustainability, energy, water quality and conservation, trophic ecology, urban ecology environmental health, and food systems. The course will be comprised of lecture, discussion lab activities and a student generated independent scientific research project.
    Prerequisites: Complete SCI-210 and MTH-180 with a grade of C- or better
    Credits: 4
    ITS
  
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    SCI 320 - Introduction to Bioinformatics


    Students learn basic cellular and molecular biology and genetics used in bioinformatics applications and algorithms in this non-programming based course. Publicly available bioinformatics databases and applications for
    analysis of molecular datasets will be explored. Students use and apply common bioinformatics tools to answer biological questions, including literature and molecular databases, genomic and proteomic sequence applications and phylogenetic analyses. No programming experience is required.
    Prerequisites: Complete SCI-115 or SCI-170 with a C or better. OR a documented 4 or 5 on the AP Biology exam.
    Credits: 3
    ITS

Social Work

  
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    SWK 100 - Social Work, Introduction to


    This is a foundations course that introduces students to the values and ethics of the profession, the various types of work and settings within which social workers are employed, and the different populations served by social workers. Students will begin to explore client-worker ethical dilemmas and how to solve them. They will learn what distinguishes social work from other helping professions and what credentials are necessary to perform direct social work practice. They will be introduced to the basic principles and codes of the profession, including their impact on the professional relationships that social workers develop.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 130 - Differently Abled: Disability as Diversity vs. Deficit


    Explores the history, major classifications culture, policies, legislation, and social discrimination of disability and introduces a strengths based model of disability as diversity versus deficit. Students survey the history of services provided to persons living with a disability, major issues and barriers that exist for individuals with differing abilities and strengths based models of practice and advocacy.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 140 - Survey of Community Agencies


    Explores the history, development and structure of human services and other helping and support systems. Information is presented on specific client populations and their relationship to these helping agencies. A thorough review of local agencies addresses merits and challenges of service delivery to clients.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 141 - Community Experience


    Students have a hands-on experience working at two local social service agencies as part of their exploration of formal helping and support systems in Survey of Community Agencies (SWK-140). The course is required for Social Work majors and is offered as an elective to other progam majors. It includes a bi-weekly classroom seminar and a 4 hour per week agency placement for 12 weeks.
    Prerequisites: Only Social Work Majors may take SWK-140 concurrently with, SWK-141.,Take SWK-140
    Credits: 1
    EHS
  
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    SWK 210 - Addiction


    The course provides an overview of addiction and substance abuse as they relate to ones interactions with family and surrounding community. It explores the history of addiction and substance abuse and analyzes students? attitudes and beliefs about them. Definitions of addiction and substance abuse from medical social and criminal justice perspectives are analyzed, along with prevention and treatment models. Students become familiar with federal, state and local agencies that study prevent, treat and regulate these disorders.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 220 - Human Life Span Development


    A study of the physiological, cognitive, social and emotional development of individuals from infancy through old age. Important milestones during the years of infancy, childhood adolescence, adulthood and aging are explored. (Spring only)
    Prerequisites: Must have completed 26 credits prior to taking this course.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 230 - Introduction to LGBTQ Studies


    This course explores the paradigm of sexuality in the United States. Students will intently engage in sociopolitical systems in which homophobia, transphobia and personal biases are created and maintained. Students will practice ally-behavior to consider the practitioner’s role in advocacy. At the end of this course, students will be able to identify the ways in which heterosexism creates disparities between heterosexual and LGBTQ peoples and recognize the impact of empowerment, as a form of agency, on LGBTQ people’s lives.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 235 - Human Behavior: Person- In- Environment


    This course focuses on understanding human behavior from an ecological perspective. The basis of this perspective views an individual or family as constantly interacting with their environment and thereby being influenced by and influencing their surroundings. Concepts such as social systems theory and human ecology will be introduced. Students will develop their own ecosystems map to apply these course concepts.
    Prerequisites: Complete 40 credits before taking this course.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 240 - Family Violence: Crisis and Justice


    This course provides an understanding of the psychological, social and legal factors related to child abuse/neglect and violent domestic relationships in America. Students will comprehend the root causes of family violence and the mutigenerational effects on its victims and society. They will identify the challenges of such acts for our criminal justice, social service and health care systems and articulate sometimes contradictory societal and legal responses to family violence?including prevention efforts protection and treatment services, legal strategies, and current legislation.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 280 - Research Methods in Social Work


    This course provides students with knowledge and training in the concepts and methods used in the conduct of social work research. The course will create a foundation for empirically grounded practice, building skills that will enable students to fill roles as both consumers and producers of social work research. The course will cover practice-based problem formulation research design, sampling, quantitative qualitative, and program evaluation measures data collection, ethical issues and applications to social work settings.
    Prerequisites: COMPLETE MTH-180.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  •  

    SWK 300 - Policy Practice: Local to Global


    This course provides students with an introduction to the development and implementation of social policies. Key factors to be addressed include how decisions are made in the public arena formulated into laws, and developed into programs. It considers the political, economic and social factors that affect social policy.
    Prerequisites: Must complete 50 credits before taking this course.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 305 - Social Justice: Oppression and Empowerment


    Students explore the origins and dynamics of discrimination and prejudice against certain racial, ethnic, age, and sexual orientaion groups in American society and how power influence economic status and social policy contribute to and reinforce oppression against such groups. Such information will form the basis for understanding one’s own values, attitudes and beliefs about others. The course will also explore our changing population and celebrate the contributions and uniqueness that diversity brings to American social order.
    Prerequisites: Complete 45 credits before taking this course.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  •  

    SWK 310 - Generalist Practice I


    Students learn how to apply the ethics knowledge, values, and skills of generalist social work practice with individuals’ thorough micro, mezzo, and macro levels of assessment and intervention. Using constructs from ecological and systems theories, and the strengths resiliency, and empowerment perspectives students learn and apply the skills used in the problem solving process of engagement assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation and termination with individuals of diverse populations and those at risk. This is the first course in the two Social Work Practice course series.
    Prerequisites: Complete SWK-100 and SWK-220 OR PSY-220 and SWK-235.,Complete SWK-100 and SWK-220 OR PSY-220 and SWK-235.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 315 - Generalist Practice II


    Students continue to expand and enhance their knowledge, values and skills in the planned change process. With professional ethics and the beginning skills of work with the individual as a client system studied within SWK 310, Generalist Practice 1, students will advance their learning and will apply theory and skills to the mezzo and macro client systems of families, groups organizations, and communities. This is the second course in the two Social Work Practice series.
    Prerequisites: Take SWK-310.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 330 - ICS:Women in China/Half Sky


    ,
    Prerequisites: COR-230, COR-240
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
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    SWK 410 - Social Work Practice With Elders


    Students develop specific knowledge about certain bio-psycho-social issues of aging, such as health concerns and well being, love and intimacy support systems, care-giving and living arrangements, productive roles and activities elder resilience and dying-bereavement-widowhood. They explore aging internationally and cross-culturally and analyze such elder social policies as income security, health, and long term care. This knowledge is applied to such social work practices as assessment and intervention, case management, advocacy and evaluation.
    Prerequisites: Take SWK-310 & SWK-315
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 420 - Social Work Practice With Children and Families


    Students focus on such social work perspectives as ecological, family systems and strengths-based models of social work practice with families. They combine this information with familial trends, ethical considerations and child and family welfare policy to develop ethcially informed and culturally sensitive practice strategies. Various approaches to working with families based on levels of need and unique family circumstances are also integrated into case planning nad intervention scenarios.
    Prerequisites: Take SWK-310 & SWK-315
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 425 - Ethics in Human Services


    Students explore the foundations of modern day ethics and ethical decisionmaking, and the specific ethical issues and dilemmas facing such social service professionals as criminal justice personnel and social workers. This course develops guidelines for resolving professional ethical dilemmas and introduces liability and litigation considerations in professional ethical practice.
    Prerequisites: Grade C or better in all prior social work classes.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 430 - Rural Social Work Practice


    Students apply the unique demographic, ethnic and cultural characteristics of US rural and small town environments to assessment and intervention strategies. Their focus is from a community-wide versus individual perspective. They learn to utilize informal and reciprocal helping networks to recognize and maintain community assets and resources, and to work collaboratively with community leaders for the well being of all. They address relevant policy issues and the implications of an evolving rural landscape in this process.
    Prerequisites: Take SWK-300 & SWK-310
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 450 - Social Work Practice, Advanced


    This capstone seminar uses simulated and actual case scenarios to fully integrate social work theory with such practice concepts as informal helping networks, case management, task-based social work, and multiracial/ethnic considerations.
    Prerequisites: Complete SWK-300, SWK-310 and SWK-315 with a minimum grade ,of C in each.,Complete SWK-425 with a minimum grade of B.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SWK 470 - Global Social Action


    With a focus on international awareness, students will optimize their field experience abroad by developing an understanding of the respective cultural, community, economic, social, and political forces that impact on their interactions with professionals, clients, and community members in the local environment. In addition to incorporating the core concepts of social work practice, students will use the international arena to integrate into their field experience the values and ethics of the profession as it is practiced in their host society, the relevant social issues and policies of the region, and the cultural forces of the surrounding community.
    Prerequisites: Take SWK-300
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  •  

    SWK 490 - Social Wk Field Experience I


    Students integrate classroom theory with practical experience at local social service agencies, under the supervision of approved field instructors and a College liaison. This advanced field placement helps students apply ethical assessment, planning and intervention, and case management skills with a variety of populations. They also incorporate the roles and values of professional social work practice in their daily interactions with clients agency personnel, and community members.
    Prerequisites: Complete SWK-300, SWK-310 and SWK-315. Must also enroll in, SWK-490S. Social Work majors only.,Take SWK-490S
    Credits: 4
    EHS
  
  •  

    SWK 490S - Integrated Social Wk Field Seminar I


    This course occurs concurrently with the first senior practicum and provides a forum for students to explore professional development and practice issues that arise within the auspices of the sponsoring agency, its staff and the clients served. Students develop skills based on the knowledge, values and ethics of the profession; practice peer supervision; monitor and evaluate their own and others’ practice skills; integrate classroom and field learning; and develop professional identities and the pursuit of lifelong learning.
    Prerequisites: Take SWK-490
    Credits: 1
    EHS
  
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    SWK 495 - Social Work Field Experience II


    Students continue to integrate classroom theory with practical experience at local social service agencies, under the supervision of approved field instructors and a College liaison. This advanced field placement helps students apply ethical assessment, planning and intervention, and case management skills with a variety of populations. They also incorporate the roles and values of professional social work practice in their daily interactions with clients, agency personnel, and community members.
    Prerequisites: Complete SWK-490 and SWK-490S with a minimum grade of B., Must also enroll in SWK-495S. Social Work majors only.,Take SWK-495S
    Credits: 4
    EHS
  
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    SWK 495S - Integrated Social Wk Field Seminar II


    The college capstone is an opportunity for students to pursue a self-directed experience in their professional program that intentionally integrates their liberal learning in the Core curriculum with their program learning. In addition to the substantive professional-based hands-on project in this class, the capstone will include a professional ethics component and a self-evaluation/self-reflection component.
    Prerequisites: Must complete COR-310, COR-320, and two sections of COR-330,All Game majors (EGPR.BS, GDES.BS, GART.BS must also,complete EGD-320 with a minimum grade of C.
    Credits: 1
    ITS

Sociology

  
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    SOC 110 - Sociology, Introduction to


    A study of human groups, culture, the self, and human interaction. The course focuses on contemporary American society and the influence of culture on our actions and beliefs, with the goal of fostering critical thinking about our social environment.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SOC 125 - Human Sexuality


    Examines social and psychological factors that,shape human sexual conduct at various levels of,the life cycle. Topics include sexual development,in early childhood, adolescence, adulthood and,old age, along with sex roles, reproduction and,the legal and social issues of sexuality. (Fall,only)
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SOC 145 - Dimensions of Social Behavior


    Explores human behaviors, characteristics and beliefs that fall outside what society generally considers “respectable” or socially acceptable. Areas such as drug addiction, family violence prostitution, street and white collar crime, and lifestyle deviations are explored.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SOC 160 - Marriage & Family


    A broad introduction to the study of marriage and,the family with emphasis on diversity and change,in society and how they affect marriage and family,life. Historical developments and alternatives to,traditional Western patterns are discussed.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SOC 250 - Death and Dying


    This course examines the nature of our society’s,attitudes toward death. Special attention is given,to the ways our society and its family, medical,,economic and religious institutions respond to,death. Psychological aspects of impending death,and the grieving process will be emphasized,throughout the course.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SOC 260 - Comparative Cultures


    This course is an in-depth analysis of the ,components of culture, focusing on the influences,exerted by culture and cultural change on,individuals and groups. The causes, functions, and,consequences of cultural change are emphasized.
    Prerequisites: 27 completed credits
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    SOC 295 - Community Service


    Students will complete at least 45 hours of ,community service approved by the College and,attend regular classes that focus on the,relationship and responsibility of business to the,larger community. Graded on a pass/fail basis.
    Credits: 1
    EHS
  
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    SOC 320 - Cultural Immersion Cohort Experience


    Students who have been accepted into the Cultural,Immersion Cohort Experience Program must enroll in,this extended-time course. Students will attend,pre-immersion training sessions in the semester,prior to travel. During their travel, students,will come together weekly with their faculty to,discuss their experiences and apply theory to,solve problems and reflect on the experience of,living as other in another culture. In the,semester after travel, students will make a public,presentation for the Champlain community about,their learning.,,
    Prerequisites: SOC-110,Minimum of 60 completed college credits and acceptance in,the Cultural Immersion Cohort Experience Program. SOC-320 is,the required corequisite course.,,,
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  •  

    SOC 325 - Cultural Immersion Community Engagement,Experience


    Students who have been accepted into the Cultural,Immersion Cohort Experience Program must enroll in,this Community Engagement Project course. The,Cohort students will seek out Community Leader,Sponsors to provide support and guidance in all,phases (development, planning, implementation,,evaluation) of their project. The number and time,frame for the projects will vary depending on the,projects complexity. The Cohort will meet on a,weekly basis to share, assist and learn from one,another’s experiences.,,
    Prerequisites: SOC-110,Minimum of 60 completed college credits and acceptance in,the Cultural Immersion Cohort Experience Program. SOC-320 is,the required corequisite course.,,
    Credits: 3
    EHS

Software Development / Engineering

  
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    SWE 140 - C++ Programming


    Topics include decisions, pointers, strings, I/O,,classes, virtual functions. Students will be given,the opportunity to put their learned knowledge to,practice by designing a team based object oriented,program as a final project. This course assumes,that students are familiar with structured,programming logic.
    Prerequisites: CIT-135
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
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    SWE 220 - Software Engineering Process


    This course provides a solid knowledge of software,development lifecycles, software development best,practices and standards. You will learn about the,software development lifecycle, associated,regulations, best practices and team dynamics. You,will dive down into such topics as full lifecycle,development, Agile Methods, Spiral Methods, CMM,,Team Management, Risk and Hazard Analysis,,Testing, Deployment and Maintenance
    Prerequisites: SWE-130
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    SWE 240 - C++ Programming II


    This course focuses on Object-Oriented,Programming (OOP) using C++. Concepts of OOP,will include classes, overloading operators,,inheritance, polymorphism, linked lists and,dynamic memory allocation.
    Prerequisites: SWE-140
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    SWE 245 - Usability Engineering


    This course will introduce the student to software,user interface design. Students will learn,techniques for researching, designing,,implementing, and evaluating user interfaces using,Visual Basic, Java or C++ GUI design tools.
    Prerequisites: SWE-130
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    SWE 250 - Java Programming II


    Teaches higher level Java language programming,concepts and techniques, including inheritance,,polymorphism, abstract classes and interfaces,,multithreading, graphical user interfaces, linked,data structures and more.
    Prerequisites: SWE-150
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    SWE 285 - Comp Sys for Software Engineers I


    This course will provide a basic knowledge of the,representation of information in the computer and,how information is processed at the machine level.,Students will also be introduced to the operation,of hardware in a computer system and the role,played by the individual units of a hardware,system.
    Prerequisites: SWE-281
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    SWE 300 - Comp Sys for Software Engineers II


    Teaches students advanced computer systems,concepts as seen from a software engineer’s,perspective. We will use lab and exercise based,instruction to cover concepts such as system level,I/O, socket programming and concurrency. Students,will leave this course with a better,understanding of how software engineering is,accomplished.
    Prerequisites: SWE-285
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    SWE 315 - Linux/ Unix Programming I


    This course will introduce the student to,programming under the Linux/UNIX Operating System,using Linux. Topics include Linux/UNIX system,architecture, Linux/UNIX-based development tools,,and Linux/UNIX programming standards.
    Prerequisites: SWE-240
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    SWE 317 - 3D Graphics for Programming


    3D Graphics Programming provides an introduction to programming the graphics rendering pipeline of modern video display workstations. You?ll utilize both the fixed pipeline and programmable shader models to affect the color, texture, lighting and geometry of objects in 3D coordinate spaces.
    Prerequisites: SWE-281
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    SWE 318 - Advanced Graphical User Interface,Programming


    Advanced Graphic User Interface (GUI) Programming,develops your ability to employ a variety of,frameworks to create rich interactive user,interfaces to applications in emerging computing,environments. You will apply current user,interaction metaphors on platforms such as Gnome,,KDE, and Windows and then be able to compare and,contrast the benefits and facilities of the GUI,development tools available.
    Prerequisites: SWE-281, SWE-317
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    SWE 325 - Software Engineering Practice II


    Students learn about the various models used for,software development and management and their,importance to good software development practice.,We will use case studies and lab exercises to,teach students about software test management,practices and their crucial role in software,design. We will also investigate some of the,major developments in software engineering,including Capability Maturity Model Integration,(CMMI), Software Engineering Management and,Analysis (SEMA) and more.
    Prerequisites: SWE-420
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    SWE 345 - .Net Architecture with C# & VB.NET


    Students are introduced to Microsoft’s .NET,framework for software development. The primary,language used in this course is C#, but the nature,of .NET development requires the student to learn,appropriate associated technologies in ASP, HTML,,XML, and other integrated technologies. This,course concentrates on .NET as it relates to,desktop application development, and includes,topics such as testing, security, deployment,,custom controls, ADO.NET and more.
    Prerequisites: SWE-200 AND ONE OF THESE THREE COURSES: SWE-240, SWE-250 OR,SWE-355
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    SWE 346 - .Net Architecture II With C#


    Students study advanced topics in Microsoft’s .NET,technology framework using C#, ASP.NET and other,related technologies. This course concentrates on,.NET as it relates to distributed application,development, and includes topics such as testing,,error handling web security, deployment, web,controls, web services, attributes, reflection,,and more.
    Prerequisites: SWE-345
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    SWE 350 - Enterprise Development With Java


    This course will provide the student with state-of-the-art skills needed to design and implement Web-based solutions to meet a variety of needs. Focusing on both client- and server-side development, the student will develop end-to-end solutions using Applets, Java Server Pages Servlets, and Enterprise Java Beans. The student will also be introduced to webservers and application servers as they tie into the development process. In addition, to round out the process, students will learn how to implement digital certificates which form the basis of Web security. They will also learn how to internationalize their programs to accommodate any language.
    Prerequisites: SWE-150
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    SWE 355 - Java Systems Development


    Students in this course will develop n-tiered Java,programs as well as learn advanced GUI,applications, developing remote objects. Students,will be able to create applications that work with,Java’s Concurrency API for multithreading and will,work with other advanced topics such as JDBC, MVC,and more.,,
    Prerequisites: Complete SWE-150, SWE-200.
    Credits: 3
    ITS

Sonic Arts

  
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    SON 120 - Fundamentals of Digital Music


    This course will teach students the basics of music, and how to create music on the computer. Topics include rhythm, phrasing, harmony, melody and song construction. This is an exciting opportunity, given the virtually unlimited power of todays Digital Audio Workstations. Music can be assembled from pre-composed elements, played live into the computer, written as notes on an electronic score, or keyed in using a midi piano keyboard. Students will use these digital tools to capture their ideas or inspiration and turn them into music. Several projects will be required, in various styles, for a number of different purposes.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    SON 131 - The History of Musical Innovation


    Provides a historical context for the music of our age, including the study of medieval through contemporary musical styles of Europe and the U.S. Particular attention will be given to innovations that transformed Western musical thought and expression through the ages. Students will develop listening skills and gain an understanding of the roots, influences and cross-cultural impacts of music of their own time and place through experience with music listening, readings, discussion and comparative analysis.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  •  

    SON 165 - Business of Music, The


    Students examine the music business industry. We cover the development of business-related knowledge and skills necessary for effectively maintaining a professional music or music management career. We study the vocabulary terminology and structure of the music industry and explore the distinction between the musical and the business aspects of the industry at the corporate level. Through completion of assignments each student develops a unique understanding of the music business and of music management.
    Credits: 3
    CCM - Communication and Creative Media
  
  •  

    SON 282 - Synthesis and Sound Design


    After a brief history of the development of electronic synthesis, students will delve into creating sounds using current industry standard synthesizers. Types of synthesis will include virtual analog frequency modulation and physical modeling. Digital audio workstations will be used to record and organize the sounds. The vast array of electronic effects in Logic will also be explored. Students will gain a functional knowledge of not only synthesis, but also powerful electronic effect and sequencing options.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  •  

    SON 340 - Film Scoring


    This course will take students through the exciting process of creating music for film. First discussing the history of music in film, and the production process, the course will then dive into the actual process of writing cues for film, including spotting, syncing to picture understanding visual sequences and dramatic intent. Students will be challenged to write cues for a variety of visual sequences in different tempos and moods.
    Prerequisites: Complete DFM-120 or by permission of Dean.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  •  

    SON 350 - Sound Design for Interactivity and Games


    The course starts with a critical look at interactive sound history examining its cultural impacts, and analyzing the underlying theory of creating immersive sound environments. Following this, the course will look at techniques and design principles specific to interactivity as students begin to learn the fundamentals of the core technology. These include sound editing software for creation and editing as well as game software. The course culminates with the creating of a complete interactive audio package.
    Prerequisites: Complete DFM-120
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  •  

    SON 440 - Advanced Projects in Sonic Arts


    Offers the opportunity to do advanced scoring and sound design work. Students will propose a substantial project (such as scoring a film, or building sound for game levels), then take the project from conception to final recording including composition, sound design orchestration, recording, signal processing mixing and mastering. Some exceptional projects may be selected for live recording sessions in a professional studio. Students will create portfolio pieces that go beyond technical proficiency, honing their work to generate emotional impact.
    Prerequisites: Complete DFM-120 and one of the following: DFM-340, EGD-350, MCM-330. Or by permission of Dean.
    Credits: 3
    CCM

Sport Management

  
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    SPT 100 - Sport Management, Introduction to


    Provides an overview of the sport management,field, its growth and development, uniqueness,,career opportunities and requirements. In,addition, this course examines the managerial,process as it applies to sport organization, and,stresses the skills and attributes required of,managers in sport and fitness settings.
    Credits: 3
    BUS
  
  •  

    SPT 250 - Sport and the Law


    The course stresses a basic understanding of legal,principles as they apply to amateur and,professional sport. Areas of study include tort,liability, constitutional law, and criminal,liability in athletics. Actual court cases,relating to these topics are examined. (Spring,only)
    Prerequisites: SPT-100
    Credits: 3
    BUS
  
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    SPT 290 - Sport Management Field Experience


    Provides students with an opportunity to gain,valuable field experience by working eight hours,or more per week at a sports-related business. In,addition, a one-hour seminar each week allows,students to share and discuss their experiences.
    Prerequisites: Must complete 45 credits before taking this course.
    Credits: 4
    BUS

Study Abroad Program

  
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    SAP 290 - Study Abroad Internship Experience


    Students will connect this internship experience with academic learning to enhance their understanding of a chosen aspect of theoretical or practical approaches to their professional field. Within the course, they will develop an internship proposal including their learning outcomes, their final project plan, and their own relevant reading list. They will participate in an internship, face-to-face classes, and an online forum throughout the semester to support their identified learning outcomes. Internship settings will vary to accommodate individual majors or minors.
    Prerequisites: 60 Credits, 3.0 GPA, and OIE approval
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    SAP 390 - Study Abroad Internship Experience


    Students will combine two days of professional work experience with weekly classroom instruction to enhance their understanding of a chosen aspect of theoretical or practical approaches to their professional field. Emphasis will be placed on intercultural communication and cross-cultural analysis of the local workplace, problem solving, and critical thinking. Students will practice self-assessment and professional readiness by developing an internship proposal that includes learning outcomes, a final project plan and their own relevant reading list.
    Prerequisites: Must complete 60 credits, have a 3.0 GPA and receive Office of International Education Approval.
    Credits: 6

Theater

  
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    THE 100 - Theater Lab


    Provides practical training in theater arts. Students will apply dramatic theory to actual production in the fall or spring mainstage plays. Projects are assigned in one or more of the following areas: acting, stage management, set construction, lighting, sound, costumes, makeup properties, box office, and publicity. This course may be taken twice.
    Credits: 1
    CCM
  
  •  

    THE 140 - Fundamentals of Acting


    Provides students with an understanding of acting techniques, with emphasis on movement discipline breathing and concentration. They will investigate the creation of character in preparation for acting in the classroom.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  •  

    THE 200 - Theater Lab


    Provides practical training in theater arts. Students will apply dramatic theory to actual production in the fall or spring mainstage plays. Projects are assigned in one or more of the following areas: acting, stage management, set construction, lighting, sound, costumes, makeup properties, box office, and publicity. This course may be taken twice.
    Prerequisites: THE-100
    Credits: 1
    CCM
  
  •  

    THE 215 - Reading Theater


    A one-credit course that addresses the writing speaking, critical thinking and global awareness competencies as students learn about performing a text. They discuss and analyze plays from a diverse selection of cultural backgrounds to determine if they are suitable for staging at Champlain College. Once a play is chosen for production, students collaboratively write a play description for advertising purposes. Students need not have any acting experience.
    Credits: 1
    CCM
  
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    THE 225 - ACT II:Intro to Scene Work


    Act II: Introduction to Scene Work teaches students how to analyze a scene and develop a character. While exploring the fundamental components of the Stanislavski approach to acting they learn to develop a personal understanding of playing an action, pursuing an objective, and working with obstacles. Students will be expected to play a role in the One-Act Festival. Students may be asked to visit classrooms and use improv to assist instructors in demonstrating concepts to the class. (Spring semester only).
    Prerequisites: THE-140
    Credits: 3
    CCM

Web Site Develop and Management

  
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    WEB 125 - Web Development


    This course introduces students to developing mobile and standard web applications using the most current industry standard tools and markup languages. Students will learn to plan, code and debug web applications. They will also develop front-end interfaces incorporating the latest standard of CSS. Students will also learn to incorporate various data, videos, images and other media into their applications to create more user-friendly and dynamic user experiences. Utilizing responsive web design is stressed throughout the course. 
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
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    WEB 150 - Web Business, Introduction to


    Introduces the World Wide Web and its development,from an information-sharing tool to a key in,business success. Examines how a business can,use the web and how to incorporate a web presence,into its current business practice. The student,will learn how to develop an effective site and,site structure as well as an understanding of,marketing the site on and off the web. Students,will develop an understanding of the global,nature of the web including international and,intercultural issues.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
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    WEB 160 - Internet & Web Architecture


    Students will gain an appreciation for the,architechtural factors that a Web manager must,consider when implementing Web servers and,services. We will discuss relevant aspects of the,architecture of the Internet including the Domain,Name System, registering domain names, obtaining,IP addresses, access technologies, and TCP/IP. We,also look closely at the Web servers themselves,,considering factors such as operating systems,Web server software, security concerns, secure,on-line transactions, server performance, Java,,CGI, Active-X, etc. Students work on a,semester-long case project to design the Web,infrastructure for an organization.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
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    WEB 225 - Intro. to Web Programming


    This course will emphasize client-side scripting with JavaScript and PHP as implemented in the major browsers available to users. It begins with a review of JavaScript that was covered in CSI 120 Mobile Development and continues with topics that complete the introduction to JavaScript. The course covers using the Document Object Model (DOM), managing events, objects and CSS to create dynamic Web applications. Students will use PHP
    programming to gain insight on the fundamentals of server-side programming.
    Prerequisites: Complete WEB-125 OR CSI-120 and CIT-200
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    WEB 265 - Implementing Web Media


    This course will focus on the implementation of,digital media to enhance web pages that are,designed for a desired presentation effect.,Students learn how to develop client-server media,applications and use Web scripting languages to,control media within web pages. Software,applications used to optimize web graphics and,animated images, streaming audio and video, VRML,and other current technologies will be covered in,the course.
    Prerequisites: WEB-225 OR MMG-210
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
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    WEB 290 - Computing Internship


    Students obtain practical experience in a,real-world computing, networking, or programming,environment in companies around the area.,With faculty supervision, students will work 120,hours in a business setting appropriate to their,major.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
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    WEB 320 - Server-Side Application Development


    Students will develop skills for application development on the web server using a standard programming language for server-side programming. The course will introduce students to advanced techniques, tools and methodologies including object oriented development, exception handling and interacting with the database. Students will apply appropriate tools and techniques through web-based projects.
    Prerequisites: Complete WEB-225
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    WEB 325 - Client Side Scripting


    This course will emphasize client-side scripting,and Dynamic HTML techniques. This course will,provide coverage of JavaScript and Cascading Style,Sheets as implemented in browsers higher than soft,Internet Explorer 4.X. Students will use the,Document Object Model (DOM) to gain access to one,or more components of a Web page. They will also,learn how to change these components based on the,actions of a user. We then look at how to apply,JavaScript to Cascading Style Sheets to allow,changes to the way a Web page looks after it has,been loaded in a browser. Teams of students work,on a semester-long project to create a dynamic Web,site for an internal or external client.
    Prerequisites: WEB-225
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    WEB 345 - Developing Web Sites with PHP


    PHP was designed to create dynamic content and is,a simple and powerful scripting language. It is,extremely popular due to its flexibility and ease,of use. Students will learn the basics of PHP,programming with a project based approach in which,they will plan, design and implement a simple,Web-based e-commerce application.
    Prerequisites: WEB-125 or permission of the Program Director.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    WEB 350 - Implementing E-Commerce Technologies


    This course examines the design and implementation of Internet technologies for the purchase and sale of goods and services, including the support of customers after the sale. It covers the relationship between the web presence and business process. Students will explore a variety of commercial packages used to create business-to-consumer stores as well as developing or enhancing their own solutions. Teams of students will develop a commercial web presence that allows the client to manage and support their business and customers.
    Prerequisites: Complete WEB-320
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    WEB 355 - Animation & Interactivity I


    Design high impact web sites, which come alive,with amazing graphics, motion, animation and,sound, adding visual excitement to the pages.,Students will learn to create web page interfaces,and effects, original animations and dynamic,graphic output, using the leading web animation,program, Flash, which allows one to quickly,animate graphics. Students will progress though an,introduction to design techniques and principles,of this creative medium to developing time-based,animations and graphics for enhancing interactive,web pages.,,
    Prerequisites: GDD-212
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  •  

    WEB 360 - Current Topics in Internet Time


    Internet time is several times faster than,ordinary time. In this course we discuss the most,recent developments and trends related to the,Internet. Students research and are presented with,emerging and important issues. Students must,analyze the impact of their findings and present,their arguments to the class.
    Credits: 1
    ITS
  
  •  

    WEB 365 - Web Architecture & the Cloud


    This course introduces the students to cloud services such as Amazon Web Services (AWS). Students will learn the concepts of cloud computing while creating scalable solutions specifically designed for AWS (and other services). Important in the architecture of these solutions would be the consideration for high-availability, secure applications, and the variety of migration paths necessary for success of the enterprise. Students will be aware of usage-based costing structures necessary for solution optimization.
    Prerequisites: Complete WEB-225
    Credits: 3
    ITS
 

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