Mar 04, 2024  
2015-2016 Undergraduate College Catalog 
    
2015-2016 Undergraduate College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Computer Information Systems

  
  • CIS 450 - Senior Thesis Project


    A senior research project to be completed in collaboration with an ACS faculty member. Students will design a project that will include a research component and an application component. The project will address a contemporary computer information system industry challenge. Students will be required to demonstrate their understanding of the subject by presenting and demonstrating the applied elements of their research. Presentations and demonstrations will be made to faculty, students and invited guests.
    Prerequisites: Must complete 90 credits before taking this course.
    Credits: 3
    ITS

Computer Information Technology

  
  • CIT 130 - Introduction to Networking and Security


    This course provides an introductory understanding of the myriad of topics related to networking ranging from local and wide area networks to the Internet, web servers and services, TCP/IP and network security. Topics will focus on relevant issues, while providing a historical context and a glimpse into emerging/future technologies. The broad survey coverage of this course teaches basic concepts and terminology that will prepare students to gain in-depth understanding in later courses, professional experiences, and outside reading and activities.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CIT 135 - Computer Theory, Introduction to


    This course gives the student an introduction to the broad discipline of computer science and software engineering. It covers topics essential to creating a foundation of knowledge before moving on to more advanced courses. Topics include an introduction to computer architecture introduction to programming logic and program design using C++, IEEE floating point representation, integer representation, two’s complement, and object-oriented principles. Students must have an understanding of algebraic problem solving.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CIT 140 - Systems Software


    This course will introduce students to operating system concepts and other forms of systems software. Students will learn about standard operating systems functional components such as memory, process/thread, file system input/output, storage and device management. Additional topics include data representation imaging, virtualization, and the history/future of systems software. Hands-on experiential learning will be used to reinforce concepts.
    Prerequisites: Complete CIT-130 OR CIT-135 with a grade of C or better.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CIT 200 - Relational Database for Web Application


    This course is an introduction to the use of relational databases on the World Wide Web. Topics covered will be relational database design database connectivity and manipulation. Students will work with a server-side tool to build and query databases using SQL. A major emphasis of the course is SQL and how to utilize it to build manipulate and create output from a database. Toward the end of the course, students will have an opportunity to work with SQL to create output from a database to a web page.
    Prerequisites: WEB-125
     
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CIT 210 - Hardware and Architecture


    Students examine the component organization hardware concepts, and architecture for all levels of computer systems. Students will be given hands-on experience involving installing configuring, and troubleshooting computer hardware. Historical and current computer architecture concepts will be covered and used as a basis to discuss future trends. Topics include: Hardware design and instruction and processing component and peripheral issues, digital logic parallel processors, Assembly Language introduction to interfacing, data acquisition and machine control, and server architecture.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CIT 265 - Information Systems


    This course is designed to introduce students to contemporary information systems and demonstrate how these systems are used throughout global organizations. The focus of this course will be on the key components of IS -people, software hardware, data, and communication technologies and how these components can be integrated and managed to create competitive advantage. Students will gain an understanding of how information is used in organizations and how IT enables improvement in quality, speed, and agility.
    Prerequisites: Must have completed 30 credits.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CIT 310 - Database Systems


    Introduces organization and processing in enterprise Database Management Systems. The student will develop skills in database systems analysis, management and processing. The structure, components, and processing of enterprise Database Management Systems (DBMS) will be covered. The course is presented from the viewpoint of operating and maintaining an enterprise level database system as well as supporting its use.
    Prerequisites: CIT-200 OR WEB-200
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CIT 365 - MIS: Enterprise Architecture


    This course explores the design, selection implementation and management of enterprise IT solutions. The focus is on applications and infrastructure and their fit with the business. Students learn frameworks and strategies for infrastructure management, system administration data/information architecture, content management distributed computing, middleware, legacy system integration, system consolidation, software selection, total cost of ownership calculation, IT investment analysis, SOA, and types of information systems. Students also hone their ability to communicate technology architecture strategies concisely to a general business audience.
    Prerequisites: CIT-265 or 60 completed credits and ITS major
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CIT 420 - Information Systems Development


    A practical project to be completed in,collaboration with an ITS faculty member. Students,will design a project that addresses a,contemporary computer information system industry,challenge and management problem. Students will be,required to demonstrate their understanding of the,subject by presenting and demonstrating their,proposals and solution. Presentations and,demonstrations will be made to faculty, students,,and invited guests.
    Prerequisites: CIT-410
    Credits: 3
    ITS

Computer Networking

  
  • NET 100 - File Management


    This course introduces the student to the command,line interface and commands to manage files in DOS,and Unix/Linux environments. Topics include file,creation, internal and external commands, and file,and disk management. Subject matter is reinforced,by hands-on laboratory exercises and assignments.
    Credits: 1
    ITS
  
  • NET 102 - Batch File Programming


    This course focuses on creating command line,programs to automate system startup, user logon,,and/or general maintenance tasks in the,DOS/Windows and Unix/Linux environments. Topics,include DOS batch file programming and Unix,scripts. Subject matter is reinforced by hands-on,laboratory exercises and assignments.
    Prerequisites: NET-100
    Credits: 1
    ITS
  
  • NET 140 - Operating Systems


    This course provides a comparative study of,popular PC-class operating systems and operating,environments, including DOS, Windows 9x(95 and,98), Windows NT, Windows 2000, and Unix. Students,will also understand the strengths and limitations,of these operating systems and be able to,identify the environments in which they are used.,Subject matter is reinforced by hands-on,laboratory exercises and assignments.
    Prerequisites: CIT-130 or CIT-135
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • NET 340 - Network Operating Systems


    Students learn how to manage systems in an ,environment employing multiple network operating,systems. We discuss topics ranging from,troubleshooting, server management, and ,internetworking to physical network design,,configuration strategies, and implementing TCP/IP,protocols. Students gain hands-on experience with,the administration of a mixed Linux, NetWare, and,Windows NT/2000 network through laboratory,exercises.
    Prerequisites: NET-120, NET-250, NET-260
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • NET 365 - Implementing Linux Security


    Students will recieve an introduction to,installing, configuring and maintaining Linux,server systems from a security perspective. This,course will serve as an administrator’s guide to,implementing security and security tools on the,Linux platform. The outcomes derived from this,course can be applied to other UNIX and Linux,variants. The course will provide the student,with a process to follow when securing a Linux,computing environment.
    Prerequisites: NET-260
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • NET 415 - Special Topics in Networking & Security


    One or more emergent networking and security,topics will be covered. Content will build on,CNIS undergraduate curriculum and relate to,industry and research trends. The course will,include issues regarding the integration of new,technology into existing network and security,systems.
    Prerequisites: Must have 90 completed credits or permission of Dean
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • NET 430 - Routers and Routing, Advanced


    This course will build upon the knowledge obtained,by a student in TEL 335 (Introduction to Routers).,Many of the topics contained in TEL 335 will be,expanded upon in order to introduce the student to,advanced router-related topics such as variable,length subnet masks, interior and exterior routing,protocols, advanced security topics, virtual LANs,,virtual private networks, switching, and voice,over IP. Lectures will be accompanied with,hands-on laboratory exercises.
    Prerequisites: TEL-335
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • NET 450 - Senior Thesis Project


    A senior research project to be completed in,collaboration with an ACS faculty member. Students,will design a project that will include a,research component and an application component.,The project will address a contemporary computer,information system industry challenge.,Students will be required to demonstrate their,understanding of the subject by presenting and,demonstrating the applied elements of their,research. Presentations and demonstrations will be,made to faculty, students, and invited guests.
    Prerequisites: Must be a Computer & Information Security major only.,Must complete 90 credits before taking this course.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • NET 460 - Linux Scripting


    Students will see actual constructs of several,Linux scripting languages (BASH, PERL, and TCL),,and will contrast the various languages and,associated techniques. Student will be required,to write scripts for specific operating functions,that relate to real world tasks. In addition to,the specific syntax required for each language,,efficient coding techniques (and documentiation),will be presented and implemented.
    Prerequisites: NET-360
    Credits: 3
    ITS

Computer Science and Innovation

  
  • CSI 120 - Introduction to Mobile Development


    Students will gain a foundational understanding of the current field of mobile computing in this course. A hands on survey of current mobile platforms will give students a strong insight into what it means to work with mobile software. Case studies of how Mobile Computing has invigorated social networks, re-writtten business models, and connected people across the far reaches of the globe will be addressed in this course.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 140 - Introduction to Programming


    Students will learn the history and basis of computing as well as the fundamentals of programming. Topics include: the history of computing, binary and hexadecimal number systems and mathematics, Boolean logic, algorithm design and implementation and modern computer organization. Programming topics include: memory and variables, mathematical operations, basic file I/O, decision making, repetitions and subroutine.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 150 - Java Programming


    Students will be taught to develop applications and applets using the Java programming language. Java is a platform-independent language that is very popular for creating Web-based applications. Topics include object orientation, selection and repetition, array processing and classes.
    Prerequisites: CIT-135
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 180 - Innovation I: Intro to Emerging Tech


    Students study innovations of the past and build their breadth of knowledge with respect to emerging technology platforms. Students work on both individual and collaborative projects to obtain hands-on experience with selected technologies. Emphasis is placed on brainstorming the expected future direction of each of the technology platforms and on identifying various ways these technologies may be combined and developed in the future.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 210 - Introduction to Data Analytics


    In computing and business, data analysis is a fundamental, challenging, and interdisciplinary task. Solving problems requires an understanding of how data is generated, analyzed, interpreted and presented. This programming intensive course is a pratical exploration of data analysis techniques using relevant languages and tools to extract meaning from data to produce and inform solutions.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 230 - Linux/Unix Programming


    Students will learn about the structure and functions of current Linux operating systems and their components such as process management memory management, and file systems. The concept of scripting will be addressed and students will learn how to create scripts to automate redundant tasks. Using C programming, students will write simple applications to learn various Linux/Unix system calls.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-140 with a grade of C or better.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 235 - Network Programming


    Students will gain a solid understanding of design and development of network applications by becoming familiar with many interfaces and frameworks required for these applications. Emphasis is placed on the design and implementation of socket-based network programs for implementing interprocess communications that comprise both client and server architectures(i.e. TCP/IP). Practical skills are developed through hands-on exercises and assignments using selected programming languages.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-240 with a grade of C or better.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 240 - Advanced Programming


    This course continues the material from Introduction to Programming that includes array structure and dynamic memory allocation. Then, the focus of this course moves toward Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) that includes topics such as objects, classes, encapsulation, abstraction modularity, inheritance, and polymorphism.
    Prerequisites: Complete MTH-230 and grade C or better in CSI-140.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 250 - Advanced Java


    Java is a powerful language for cross-platform object-oriented application programming. It can be found in many types of applications such as standalone, web, enterprise, and mobile. This student will learn the more advanced Java features including data structures multi-threading, Swing, Servlet Programming, Java Database Connectivity, Remote Method Invocation and application development.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-150 with a C- or better
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 280 - Innovation II: Open Source Software Dev


    Students will explore the history, philosophy mechanics, and practices of the open source movement. Students will research some of the most prevalent and cutting- edge open source technologies, and gain experience working with the tools and techniques used in open source software development.
    Prerequisites: Grade C or better in CSI-240.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 281 - Data Structures & Algorithms


    This course will introduce the student to the methods of data storage in computer memory and on media. It will also introduce students to many of the foundation algorithms that are a key to well-written code.
    Prerequisites: CSI-240 with minimum grade of C or better.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 300 - Database Management Systems


    This course will introduce students to the principle of database management systems. Other topics include Relational Algebra, Structured Query Language (SQL), normalization, stored procedures, triggers and concurrency.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-281, with a minimum grade of C.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 310 - OLAP: Online Analytical Processing


    In computing and business, data analysis is a fundamental, challenging, and interdisciplinary task. This programming intensive course is centered around OLAP, Online Analytical Processing. OLAP is a technique that utilizes multidimensional data analysis to aid with decision making. Students will learn the basics of SQL to extract stored information and design effective data analysis, with a focus on interpretation and communication of results.
    Prerequisites: Take CSI-210
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 319 - Programming for Mobile Devices


    This course will introduce the students to the third wave of computing, mobile programming. It will also expose the students to the various constraints in programming for mobile devices while incorporating networking and security in their programs. Students will typically be using the .NET Compact Framework or Java Mobile Edition. Topical
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-120, CSI-240.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 320 - Global IT & Ethics


    Students will take a step back from hands on development work to learn about the field of computer science and how it affects, and is affected by society and the global community. Students will be presented with various case studies on such topics as social networks outsourcing, intellectual property, and the unintended effects of software systems and many others.
    Prerequisites: 60 completed credits.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 330 - Software Development Methodologies


    Methods and management of software development projects is an essential topic area for software engineers. Beginning with understanding software engineering as a professional practice, Software Development Methodologies explores industry methodologies such as waterfall, agile prototyping, and rapid application development among others. Practical projects are used to familiarize students with methodologies. This course also investigates management skills and tools related to software development.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-281
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 335 - Software Systems Analysis and Design


    This course is intended to provide comprehensive balanced and up-to-date coverage of systems analysis and design. The course maintains the dual focus on the concepts and techniques from both the traditional, structured approach and the object-oriented approach to systems development. Project management, teamwork and presentation skills are also emphasized.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-281 with a grade of C or better.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 340 - Software Specialties


    As part of a software engineering education students should consider software design and development in specialized domains. This course introduces students to specialty areas and examines their characteristics that influence an application’s design and construction. Projects and prototypes give students applied practice developing software in specialty areas such as embedded/real-time systems, safety critical systems, and agent-based systems.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-281
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 350 - Mobile Computing


    Students explore the field of mobile computing and how mobile technology can be used to perform useful, productive everyday tasks at home and at work. An in-depth look into today’s relevant mobile platforms is provided and the challenges of adapting common desktop practices to the unique requirements of mobile devices are covered. Strategies for developing complex software solutions are adapted for use on mobile devices.
    Prerequisites: Take CSI-220 and MTH-210 OR MTH-230.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 360 - Mobile Architecture


    Students dive into the world of Mobile Architecture and explore the methods necessary to create successful end-to:..end client/server mobile solutions. A thorough investigation into how mobile architecture can be used to provide effective mobile user experience in work and play is provided. Students design and prototype their own mobile architecture based upon a real-world scenario they research and outline.
    Prerequisites: CSI-350
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 370 - Computer Architecture


    Students will be introduced to common computer systems from the ground up. Knowledge obtained in this course will help students leverage new technologies to their fullest potential: Low-level differences between common x86 architecture and other past, present and future processors will be examined. The internals of everyday computers will be discussed along with how each of the common components such as RAM, hard-drives are utilized in system software. As time allows students will be given insight into new and exciting architectures such as quantum/optical and chemical computation.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-281.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 380 - Innovation III: Technology Partnership


    In this course, students will work directly with local technology organizations to understand real-world business challenges and design innovative solutions using emerging technologies. Students will work in groups to build working product prototypes and to assess the potential value and limitations of their proposed innovations.
    Prerequisites: CSI-280
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 385 - Operating Systems Architecture


    This course will give the student an understanding of the architecture of modern operating systems and how software interacts with those operating systems.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-230, CSI-281.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 389 - Programming Mobile Devices, Advanced


    In this course the student will be able to pursue an advanced level of knowledge on programming Mobile Device(s). The student will be able to choose a project which culminates in a published application. One possible area is the iOS for iPhone/iPad/iTV.
    Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor required
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 390 - Junior Computing Internship


    Students obtain practical experience in a,real-world computing, networking, or programming,environment in companies around the area.,With faculty supervision, students will work 120,hours in a business setting appropriate to their,major.
    Prerequisites: Must complete 30 credits before taking this course.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 400 - Real Time Systems


    With real time systems the result of a calculation,is important, but also important is the time when,the result is available. Students are exposed to,the concept of real time programming in which a,system operates in a time-scale that is determined,by the time scale of the process. The system,reacts to external events usually with a time,constraint on the reaction time. Students learn,how hardware and software interact, what an,interrupt is, and how to develop an event driven,system. The analysis of response time from input,to output will be introduced along with memory,optimization techniques.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-281.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 420 - Software Re-Engineering


    This course explores software re-engineering techniques and processes that facilitate the evolution and maintenance of software systems. The course covers techniques such as source code analysis, reverse engineering, and software restructuring. Data flow and design, business processes, and cost-benefit are considered. Students work collaboratively to re-engineer an existing software system.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-281 and 60 credits
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 430 - Software Testing, Qa & Security


    Students will learn how to verify, improve, and secure the function of software systems. Through the use of various testing tools and procedures that implement unit/regression tests, performance tests, as well as robust error handling, students will learn how to ensure the proper operation of their software. Valuable insight into quality assurance and bug tracking will also be taught with emphasis on the request/ticketing systems that help facilitate this work.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-281, with a minimum grade of C.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 435 - Applied Software Practice I


    This is the first semester of a two semester capstone project in the Software Engineering for Emerging Technologies Major. In this course students will begin full lifecycle development of a software system, including requirements analysis, project planning, staffing, technology selection and systems design. Conceptual materials delivered in this course will be immediately applied to the comprehensive capstone project.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-335 and must have completed 90 credits.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 436 - Applied Software Practice II


    This is the second semester of a two semester capstone project in the Software Engineering for Emerging Technologies Major. In this course students will continue full lifecycle development of a software system, including system development, testing, integration, deployment and maintenance. Students will also be required to use proper project management and documentation techniques. Conceptual materials delivered in this course will be immediately applied to the comprehensive capstone project.
    Prerequisites: CSI-435
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 440 - Software Requirements Engineering


    This course is intended to provide in-depth investigation of the Requirements and Design phases of the software development life cycle. The course maintains a focus on concepts techniques, and practical experience following phase processes. Requirements and Design documentation is developed. Project managament teamwork and presentation skills are also emphasized.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-281 and 60 credits
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 485 - Distributed Operating Systems


    Students will learn about a wide variety of distributed computing applications along with the structure through which they operate. Distributed systems exist for a multitude of applications such as complex scientific simulations, peer-to-peer communication, defeating encryption algorithms scalable server hosting, and even massively multiplayer online games. Throughout this course students will examirie similarities and differences in how these systems operate and how they provide an edge over conventional solutions.
    Prerequisites: Complete CSI-385 with a grade of C or better.
    Credits: 3
    ITS
  
  • CSI 490 - Senior Computing Internship


    Students obtain practical experience in a,real-world computing, networking, or programming,environment in companies around the area. With,faculty supervision, students will work 120 hours,in a business setting appropriate to their major.
    Prerequisites: You must complete 75 credits before taking this course.
    Credits: 3
    ITS

Core

  
  • COR 110 - Concepts of the Self


    How are contemporary developments in art literature, psychology and science challenging our traditional notion of what it means to be human? Students will have the chance to explore how these fields approach questions about humanity and individuality as they begin to build an interdisciplinary perspective on their own lives. Students will study texts and artifacts from multiple disciplines as they learn about different ways in which the self is understood, lived, and expressed.
    Prerequisites: COR-115 is the required co-requisite course.
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 115 - Rhetoric of Self


    Students learn rhetorical strategies to read and write in response to academic texts in various disciplines. Thematically linked to COR 110, the course teaches students to engage with ideas and work through difficult texts by posing meaningful questions and analyzing both what a text says and how it says it. Students learn to think and effectively communicate through critical reading critical writing, speaking and reflection.
    Prerequisites: COR-110 is the required co-requisite course.
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 120 - Concepts of Community


    In the age of instantaneous and open communication, economic globalism and intercontinental travel, never has the question of the possibilities and limits of human community been more important. What are the practices and institutions that bind us together? What are the structures of communities and how do these limit and define us as individuals? Exploring such questions through history, philosophy and economics, students will develop an interdisciplinary perspective on community in the modern world and their place in it.
    Prerequisites: COR-110, COR-115 COR-125 IS THE REQUIRED COREQUISITE COURSE
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 125 - The Rhetoric of Community


    Building on the skills learned in COR 115, this second-semester course teaches students to develop thoughtful and researched arguments based on critical reading and discussion of diverse texts. Students continue to learn strategies for writing texts that are clear coherent, comprehensive, creative, concise and correct for a specific audience and purpose.
    Prerequisites: COR-110, COR-115 COR-120 IS THE REQUIRED COREQUISITE COURSE
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 130 - Interdisciplinary Studies, Introduction


    COR 130 introduces transfer students to interdisciplinary studies, the inquiry method of instruction, and the intellectual approach necessary for successfully participating in the second-year Core curriculum. The course covers selected content from COR 110 and COR 120 including psychology, natural science, art literature, history, philosophy, sociology, and economics. COR 130 is an intense six-week experience.
    Prerequisites: Must be a transfer student with at least 24 completed credits ENG-111, ENG-112 are either prerequisites or corequisites
    Credits: 6
    COR
  
  • COR 210 - Scientific Revolutions


    The challenges of the 21st century demand an understanding of the nature and limitations of scientific thinking, the place of science within society, and its relationship to other forms of human thought and expression such as religion art and literature. This course will examine three major transformations of scientific ideas and their social and historical context, and will help students gain a broad understanding of the relationship of scientific ideas to other forms of thought and expression.
    Prerequisites: Complete COR-120 and COR-125 or COR-130 and ENG-112
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 220 - Aesthetic Expressions


    What is art? How do literature and music express both traditional and revolutionary ideas? This course will explore the nature of artistic musical and literary expression in the Western tradition. Students will analyze and discuss major artistic, musical, and literary accomplishments of Western culture and explore how the arts function as expressions of cultural ideals and as forces of challenge and transformation.
    Prerequisites: Complete COR-120 and COR-125 or COR-130 and ENG-112
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 230 - Ethics and the Environment


    The decisions that humans make about the environment today will decide the fate of future generations. Understanding the relationship between humans and the environment, along with the ethical frameworks used to interact with and make decisions about the environment, is of paramount importance. This course will investigate the origins and evolution of environmental ethics, as well as the contributions of scientific research and aesthetic expression, to trace human perceptions of the environment throughout history and address todays environmental issues.
    Prerequisites: Complete COR-120 and COR-125 or COR-130 and ENG-112
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 240 - Bodies


    From Neolithic fertility goddesses to contemporary piercings and tattoos, human cultures are inextricably entangled with ideas about the body. Perceptions and experiences of the body influence ethical debates about media representation, healthcare, and biotechnology. This course explores “embodiment” in the Western tradition: How do we know ourselves through our physical bodies? How are different types of bodies represented in our arts and media? And how does the body influence the way we think about the world?
    Prerequisites: COR-110, COR-115, COR-120, COR-125
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 250 - The Secular and the Sacred


    What roles do religion and spirituality play in society? By applying theoretical frameworks used to study religion as a cultural phenomenon, by examining the development and influence of religious and spiritual traditions in the West and by exploring diverse religious and spiritual identities in contemporary Western society students will investigate the ways religion and spirituality have shaped personal, political social, and cultural institutions and practices in the West.
    Prerequisites: Complete COR-120 and COR-125 or COR-130 and ENG-112
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 260 - Democracies


    The 20th century saw the international triumph of the twin pillars of modern Western life: capitalism and democracy. The 21st century problems of globalism, environmental degradation and terrorism, however, all pose unique challenges to these institutions. This course will study the origins and development of our primary ideals of social organization. Students will actively engage questions about the value and future of capitalism and democracy while learning about its past.
    Prerequisites: Complete COR-120 and COR-125 or COR-130 and ENG-112
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 270 - Heroines and Heroes


    Western culture has long reserved a special word for the greatest human achievements: heroic. Heroic tales range from ancient epics to today’s movies, sports broadcasts, political campaigns etc. What do heroic stories tell us about who we are, have been, and aspire to be? Does heroic describe our ultimate potential, or has it lost meaning? This course examines heroines/heroes in wide-ranging works, adopting varied critical approaches to examining their profound influence on how we understand ourselves and our world.
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 280 - Colonialism and Western Identity


    The West: what is it? Is it a place, a set of ideas and traditions, a period of history, an economic or political system? This course will examine how the West must be understood through encounters with the rest of the world, through the interactions between West and non-West. Colonialism initially determined the nature of those interactions, and the legacies of colonialism continue to shape Western identity today.
    Prerequisites: COR-120 and COR-130, OR COR-130 and ENG-112.
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 310 - The Global Condition


    Is the world getting better? Is there such a thing as global “progress” and, if so, what does it look like? Students will examine the idea of progress from different theoretical, cultural and marginalized perspectives, considering how progress has been defined, by whom, and by which standards. They will apply their understandings of progress to contemporary global phenomena such as economic globalization, international organizations, violent conflict, interactions between humans and the environment, and the spread of new technologies.
    Prerequisites: COR-210, COR-220, COR-230, COR-240 COR-320 is the required corequisite course.
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 311 - Acting Against the State: Performance, Protest and Terror


    What happens when an individual or group strongly disagrees with government policies? If political processes are not in place to address the desired change, or if those processes are perceived as inadequate, the dissenting individual or group might well resort to symbolic forms of protest. While such symbolic protests are frequently non-violent, certain actions do make use of violence. What our society labels as “terrorism” might be viewed through this lens. This class will examine social protest as a form of performance and public rhetoric. The approach will be distinctly interdisciplinary, relying on perspectives from the fields of communication theater studies, sociology and political science. We will not shy away from a controversial exploration of terrorist acts, including the events of 9/11
    Prerequisites: 60 completed credits
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 312 - Technology As a Disruptive Force


    In today?s society where our work, fun and personal connections are managed and influenced by technology, have you ever wondered how technology will shape your future? We will explore how technological innovation has been viewed over time by philosophers, writers and sociologists. Which perspectives hold true today? What about present-day perspectives? Do you think they will hold true tomorrow? How do we imagine that society and ultimately our place within will be affected day-by-day as technology continues to advance?
    Prerequisites: 60 completed credits
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 313 - Pandemics: Panic, Pathology and,Preparation


    Are pandemics really the new global terror, or are they a convenient media villain? And what is the suitable response, if not terror and panic? Students will learn about the origins and spread of pandemics, and the media frenzy and public panic that often accompanies them. Working with public health workers across the globe, they will create materials that help better prepare for pandemics, and will make a final presentation that addresses the question “How can students provide leadership in the event of a pandemic?”?
    Prerequisites: Must have 60 completed credits
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 320 - Global Studies II: Human Rights and Responsibilities


    Are human rights universal? Should they be? This course uses film, fiction, and other contemporary media and traditional sources to explore how different groups of people around the world define and debate human rights. Students will investigate how a variety of religious, philosophical, and social traditions challenge contemporary efforts to find a global definition of human rights.
    Prerequisites: COR-210, COR-220 COR-230 COR-240 COR-310 is the required corequisite course.
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 330 - Local Contexts, Global Connect


    In an interconnected world, what makes particular peoples or places unique? How do the forces of tradition and change play out in different local contexts? Each COR 330 section allows students guided by faculty with relevant expertise, to gain in-depth knowledge of a particular people culture, and/or region. Students generate their own questions about continuity and change as the global meets the local, and participate in a dialogue about the various topics studied in all COR 330 courses.
    Prerequisites: Complete four 200-level Core courses
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 410 - Core 11


    Prerequisites: COR-330 COR-340
    Credits: 5
    COR
  
  • COR 415 - The Mosaic of India


    The Mosaic of India is a general elective, which focuses on Indian culture and includes a ten day trip to India. In addition to regular class meetings, students will see the caves of Aranubad the Taj Mahal, Hindu Temples of the southern subcontinent, Buddhist holy sites, and Mumbai, the thriving business center of India. Students will keep a journal during the trip abroad. Students will have the opportunity to interface with the staff and students of the Champlain campus in Mumbai. The student will bear the additional cost of airfare, meals, housing, and transportation while in India. Travel will take place in the during the summer months with classroom meetings in the fall term.
    Prerequisites: HIS-313 or permission of the instructor
    Credits: 3
    COR
  
  • COR 470 - Global Studies Senior Seminar


    Allows seniors in the Global Studies minor to deepen their understanding of global relationships, institutions, and differences, and to explore their own path towards a globalized personal and professional life. Students write a biography of a global citizen, study an international institution that impacts their future profession, and use social theory as a tool for understanding identity, power, and resistance on the world stage. Offered only during fall semesters.
    Prerequisites: Permission of the Assistant Dean of Global Engagement. Intended for senior students in the Global Studies Minor.
    Credits: 3
    COR

Creative Media

  
  • CCM 490 - Summer Internship


    This is a zero credit course for students completing internship hours in the summer and taking and internship course in the fall.
    Prerequisites: Approval of the Dean
    Credits: 0
  
  • CRE 100 - Making Art


    This foundational course for Creative Media program students will explore areas necessary for artistic exploration and achievement. These areas include: inspiration, mimesis, essence abstraction, mixed media, execution and audience. We will draw upon several artistic disciplines in this class, namely visual art, creative writing interactive design, filmmaking and videography games, music and sound, and performance.
    Prerequisites: Must be enrolled in CREM.BFA, or by permission of Dean.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  • CRE 100L - Making Art - Studio


    This foundational course for Creative Media program students will explore areas necessary for artistic exploration and achievement. These areas include: inspiration, mimesis, essence abstraction, mixed media, execution and audience. We will draw upon several artistic disciplines in this class, namely visual art, creative writing interactive design, filmmaking and videography games, music and sound, and performance.
    Credits: 0
    CCM
  
  • CRE 200 - Creative Media Salon I


    The Creative Media “Salon” experiences, along with the Studio courses, are the cornerstone of the program. The Salon provides an environment for students from different creative focus areas to come together and explore the creative process, to intellectually contextualize their own work and the work of their peers, to collaborate if desired, and to continually expand their horizons. The Salon is part seminar and part workshop-offering students the simultaneous experiences of hands-on experimentation, creating personal work critiquing one another’s work, and discussing the connections between aesthetic theory and artistic practice. This “art as inquiry” process was embedded in the CRE 100 course for first year students, so at this point (in their second year), it should be a way of working with which they are familiar. The Salon is not a mere,”playground,” however; it will be grounded in specific readings, creative hands-on projects and-most importantly for Salon 1 and 2-the student’s parallel Core experience. The Salon 1 course will work with the content of COR 220, the Aesthetics course. Thus, the focus here will be on the Western art tradition, and the function and power of art in society. We will take the issues raised in COR 220, and work with them as a community of artists. There will be supplementary readings and key creative projects to help unpack the specific topical areas.
    Prerequisites: COMPLETE CRE-100.
    Credits: 1
    CCM
  
  • CRE 250 - Creative Media Portfolio I


    Combine the skills and ideas you’ve acquired in multiple areas of creative media studies to begin producing a body of work that is professionally executed and has conceptual integrity. Through a combination of class critique and special studio sessions, you will strive to realize work that reflects your unique creative vision.
    Prerequisites: COMPLETE CRE-200.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  • CRE 250L - Creative Media Port 1 - Studio


    Combine the skills and ideas you’ve acquired in multiple areas of creative media studies to begin producing a body of work that is professionally executed and has conceptual integrity. Through a combination of class critique and special studio sessions, you will strive to realize work that reflects your unique creative vision.
    Credits: 0
    CCM
  
  • CRE 300 - Creative Media Salon II


    What is it in art that brings us together across cultures and continents, and finally, what is it in art and the world that art represents that defines us essentially as human beings? In this two-credit salon, CREM students will be given the framework and structure to find their own lives in the discussion. This course will be offered online only, with the hope that the majority of students will be participating from their study abroad sites.
    Prerequisites: COMPLETE CRE-200, CRE-250.
    Credits: 2
    CCM
  
  • CRE 350 - Creative Media Portfolio 2


    In this upper level portfolio class you will learn to refine your creative vision and hone your artistic craft. A panel of faculty and special guests will provide critique and challenge you to push your creative work further. Special studio sessions will further enrich and expand your artistic practice.
    Prerequisites: Complete CRE-250, CRE-300
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  • CRE 350L - Creative Media Portfolio 2 - Studio


    In this upper level portfolio class you will learn to refine your creative vision and hone your artistic craft.  A panel of faculty and special guests will provide critique and challenge you to push your creative work further.  Special studio sessions will further enrich and expand your artistic practice.
    Prerequisites: Complete CRE-250, CRE-300. Must be taken concurrently with CRE-350.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  • CRE 400 - Creative Media Salon 3


    Does an artist carry a responsibility to champion new technology, preserve culture, or speak to human rights? Is newer necessarily better? In addition to wrestling with such questions, in this third Creative Media “Salon” we examine issues of self-branding, marketing, professional presentation, and other key career-oriented issues that impact innovative artists. Students will discover where they fit in, and as importantly, where they don’t. This will lead to a plan for how to,”position” oneself upon graduation.
    Prerequisites: Complete CRE-300, CRE-350
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  • CRE 490 - Creative Media Internship


    This course provides Creative Media BFA students with hands-on experience at a designated internship site. Students apply skills and aptitudes developed in the classroom in actual professional settings at organizations such as museums, galleries, design studios or media production companies. During the semester students must work a minimum of 135 hours at the internship site.
    Prerequisites: CREM.BFA students with 57 or more completed credits and program director approval.
    Credits: 3
    CCM

Criminal Justice

  
  • CRJ 120 - Criminal Law


    Provides a comprehensive analysis of the fundamentals of substantive criminal law. Students will learn the essential elements of crimes and the rationale underlying criminal law. The nature of jurisdiction, the criminal act, the criminal state of mind and matters affecting responsibility for criminal conduct are included. (Fall only)
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  • CRJ 121 - Criminal Procedure


    This course focuses on the rules and procedures governing how the American criminal justice system must process individuals suspected, accused, and convicted of law violations. (Spring only)
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  • CRJ 150 - American Correctional System, the


    A critical survey of the correctional system covering historical development of the American correctional system, probation and parole correctional facilities, community corrections programs, and current problems, needs and trends. (Spring only)
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  • CRJ 225 - The Law of Searching, Seizing and Using Digital Evidence


    Computer evidence (“digital evidence”) is being used every day in our country to convict criminals of crimes ranging from possession of child pornography to embezzlement to murder. Every competent, modern law enforcement officer understands the significance of digital evidence in every case submitted for prosecution. Students will be required to learn, and apply legal principles that govern how this vital evidence is recovered (and used) to insure that it will be legally admissible in court.
    Prerequisites: Complete CRJ-120, FOR-240 and 60 completed credits, or permission of the Program Director.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  • CRJ 230 - Criminal Investigation


    Studies the history, theory and fundamentals of criminal investigation from the crime scene to the courtroom, with emphasis on techniques appropriate to specific crimes. (Spring only)
    Prerequisites: Take CRJ-120 or CRJ-121.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  • CRJ 240 - Family Violence: Crisis and Justice


    This course provides an understanding of the psychological, social and legal factors related to child abuse/neglect and violent domestic relationships in America. Students will comprehend the root causes of family violence and the mutigenerational effects on its victims and society. They will identify the challenges of such acts for our criminal justice, social service and health care systems and articulate sometimes contradictory societal and legal responses to family violence?including prevention efforts protection and treatment services, legal strategies, and current legislation.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  • CRJ 260 - Research Methods in Criminal Justice


    A research project related to a specific police or,correctional interest or operation in consultation,with the faculty advisor. Course meets at the,discretion of the instructor; project required for,grade.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  • CRJ 270 - Police Operations & Supervision


    Studies activities of law-enforcement agencies with emphasis on the patrol function and the prevention of crime, including traffic investigative, juvenile, vice and other specialized operational units. (Fall only)
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  • CRJ 280 - Part-Time Law Enforcement Officer,Certification


    Provides students with information and training to,prepare for certification as a part-time police,officer in Vermont, exclusive of firearm training.,The primary focus is on police procedure, with,attention spent on criminal law, laws of arrest,,search and seizure, juvenile law, and laws,regarding motor vehicles and liability. At the end,of the course, students will have the opportunity,to take the state exam for Vermont Criminal,Justice Training Council standards for Phase 1,Certification.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  • CRJ 290 - CRJ Field Experience


    Prerequisite: Criminal Justice major, second year status. Requires twelve hours per week of field work. Students will participate in and observe at local police departments, correctional facilities and other related criminal justice agencies. Students are expected to arrange their own transportation.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  • CRJ 310 - Investigative Interviewing


    This is an introductory course dealing with the principles and practices of interviewing. The course will include a review of interviewing theory and practical exercises intended to help students interested in criminal justice or public service to develop effective interviewing skills.
    Prerequisites: CRJ-230 or permission of Program Director
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  • CRJ 420 - Research Methods Criminal Justice II


    A research project related to a specific police or,correctional interest or operation in consultation,with faculty advisor. Course meets at discretion,of the advisor; project paper required for grade.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  • CRJ 450 - Seminar in Criminal Justice


    An in-depth examination of selected topics related,to effective policing such as, but not limited to,,the issues of recruitment, retention, excessive,force, corruption, civilian review boards,,community-based policing, allocation of resources,,cultural diversity, participative management, job,stress, and program budgeting. Emphasis is,directed toward leadership and executive,development. Project paper or comprehensive,examination required for grade.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  • CRJ 480 - Criminal Investigations, Advanced


    This course provides Criminal Justice majors with a comprehensive learning experience involving the art of criminal investigations. Students will review selected material from previous criminal justice courses and apply this knowledge to simulated crime scenes. Students will initially receive guidance from instructors, but will eventually perform investigations individually and as part of an investigative team.
    Prerequisites: CRJ-310 Must complete 90 credits before taking this course.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  • CRJ 490 - Criminal Justice Field Experience


    Requires twenty-four hours per week of field-work. Students will routinely be required to meet with a supervising faculty member on campus and at their internship site. Students, with the aid of a Criminal Justice faculty member, are allowed to select from any state, local, or federal criminal justice agency participating in this program. Students are expected to provide their own transportation.
    Prerequisites: Must complete 90 credits before taking this course.
    Credits: 6
    EHS
 

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