Nov 27, 2021  
2015-2016 Undergraduate College Catalog 
    
2015-2016 Undergraduate College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Criminal Justice

  
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    CRJ 495 - Vermont Police Academy, Enforcement Training


    An intensive 15-week program in residence at the Vermont Police Academy. This course is offered to qualified Professional Studies/Criminal Justice majors who must meet the admission standards of the Academy.
    Prerequisites: Must have permission from the program director and meet the admission requirements of the Police Academy.
    Credits: 15
    EHS

Digital Filmmaking

  
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    DFM 100 - Film Studies: Screenings


    Provides critical exposure to film in all its varieties. Students will apply aspects from other film courses to evaluate criteria for a,”successful” (or “failed”) film. Post-screening discussions, readings of key essays, and periodic analysis or response papers will foster student’s ability to critically analyze and articulate all aspects ofthe craft, including screenwriting cinematography, editing, acting, and sound. This course will be taken over three different semesters.
    Prerequisites: DFM majors only.
    Credits: 1
    CCM
  
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    DFM 100A - Film Studies: Screenings


    Provides critical exposure to film in all its varieties. Students will apply aspects from other film courses to evaluate criteria for a “successful” (or “failed”) film. Post-screening discussions, readings of key essays, and periodic analysis or response papers will foster student’s ability to critically analyze and articulate all aspects ofthe craft, including screenwriting cinematography, editing, acting, and sound. This course will be taken over three different semesters.
    Prerequisites: DFM majors only.
    Credits: 1
    CCM
  
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    DFM 100B - Film Studies: Screenings


    Provides critical exposure to film in all its varieties. Students will apply aspects from other film courses to evaluate criteria for a “successful” (or “failed”) film. Post-screening discussions, readings of key essays, and periodic analysis or response papers will foster student’s ability to critically analyze and articulate all aspects ofthe craft, including screenwriting cinematography, editing, acting, and sound. This course will be taken over three different semesters.
    Prerequisites: DFM majors only.
    Credits: 1
    CCM
  
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    DFM 100C - Film Studies: Screenings


    Provides critical exposure to film in all its varieties. Students will apply aspects from other film courses to evaluate criteria for a “successful” (or “failed”) film. Post-screening discussions, readings of key essays, and periodic analysis or response papers will foster student’s ability to critically analyze and articulate all aspects ofthe craft, including screenwriting cinematography, editing, acting, and sound. This course will be taken over three different semesters.
    Prerequisites: DFM majors only.
    Credits: 1
    CCM
  
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    DFM 110 - Filmmaking, Introduction to


    In this course students are introduced to the language of film. Through a combination of lecture, screenings, discussion research and cohort projects students will investigate the fundamentals of time-based media (the fourth dimension), the evolving landscape of film production and the social impact of filmic-storytelling.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 120 - Fundamentals of Digital Music


    This course will teach students the basics of music, and how to create music on the computer. Topics include rhythm, phrasing, harmony, melody and song construction. This is an exciting opportunity, given the virtually unlimited power of today?s Digital Audio Workstations. Music can be assembled from pre-composed elements, played live into the computer, written as notes on an electronic score, or keyed in using a midi piano keyboard. Students will use these digital tools to capture their ideas or inspiration and turn them into music. Several projects will be required, in various styles, for a number of different purposes.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 185 - Directing & Acting for the Screen


    Students will learn to break down and analyze film performances by significant filmmakers whose work with actors is considered important to the history of film. Students will study Stanislavski-based technique and work on scenes with partners to fully understand and relate to the process of acting, which they can then apply to their own filmmaking practice.
    Prerequisites: Digital Film and Filmmaking students only.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 210 - Film History


    As an overview of film history and aesthetics this course explores film history from 1895 to the present. Emphasis is on the development of film as a technology, an art form, an industry, and a cultural institution. The class will research and discuss genres, movements, directors, and landmarks in film history.
    Prerequisites: Must complete 30 credits before taking this course.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 220 - Film Theory


    From its earliest days, cinema has attracted intellectual proponents, theorists and aestheticians inspired to write on the nature of cinema and its effects on culture. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the major theoretical positions and debates in film theory and identify how these theories have influenced filmmakers and their work. Through texts and film screenings, the course will examine selected authors and specific theories including Structuralism, Realism, Semiotics and Postmodernism.
    Prerequisites: DFM-210
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 225 - Cinematography and Lighting


    This course focuses on cinematic storytelling and explores digital video cinematography techniques for both studio and field. Students will familiarize themselves with multiple digital video camera formats. Students will also use lighting equipment, determine set and lighting needs block scenes, and become familiar with topics including film space, continuity, lenses, color, filters and camera control. Over the course of the semester, students will collaborate to produce a number of short works in both field and studio environments.
    Prerequisites: Must have completed 27 credits
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 225L - Cinematography & Lighting Studio


    Credits: 0
    CCM
  
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    DFM 228 - Screenwriting I


    The course provides an intensive introduction to screenwriting. Presented as a seminar and writing workshop, the class reads and discusses short and feature-length screenplays, including their own works-in-progress, as well as comparing the screenwriting of professionals to the films those scripts became. Writing one short and one feature-length screenplay leads students to integrate theory and practice as they explore the viability of story ideas in the film medium character development, conflict, dialogue writing dramatic structure, and industry standards for script formatting.
    Prerequisites: COR-115 or ENG-111
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 230 - Audio & Video Editing


    Through a combination of classroom instruction and project-based work in the Multimedia and Video labs, students will develop skills in audio and video recording, digitizing, producing and editing for implementation in television, radio and multimedia.
    Prerequisites: Complete MCM-220 , GDD-210, or DFM-225
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 230L - Audio & Video Editing Studio


    Through a combination of classroom instruction and project-based work in the Multimedia and Video labs, students will develop skills in audio and video recording, digitizing, producing and editing for implementation in television, radio and multimedia.
    Prerequisites: Complete MCM-220 , GDD-210, or DFM-225
    Credits: 0
    CCM
  
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    DFM 240 - Applied Video


    You understand the principles of video creation and you’re eager for more. In this class you will investigate video as a phenomenon, the evolution creative possibilities, technical components and output methods such as Pod-casting, installation and DVD authoring. Through a combination of lecture, research and hands on investigation you will be introduced to video history, the format wars, sound design, advanced editing styles and compression.
    Prerequisites: MMG-230
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 250 - Introduction to Stop Motion Animation


    This course guides students through the active creation of several individual stop motion animation projects while developing their knowledge and expertise in traditional stop motion animation techniques using modern computing technology. Students present their developing ideas and original projects for critical assessment. Students are also exposed to the rich history and evolution of stop motion animation.
    Prerequisites: 27 completed credits
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 260 - Documentary Filmmaking


    This course will explore the history of documentary filmmaking with a focus on the social impact of the form. The potential power of video for advocacy, activism, and social change will be highlighted through screenings and production exercises. Students will produce documentary sequences based on the core documentary elements of observation, interview, and montage.
    Prerequisites: Must have completed 27 credits.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 281 - Canadian Culture Through Films


    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 282 - Synthesis and Sound Design


    After a brief history of the development of electronic synthesis, students will delve into creating sounds using current industry standard synthesizers. Types of synthesis will include virtual analog frequency modulation and physical modeling. Digital audio workstations will be used to record and organize the sounds. The vast array of electronic effects in Logic will also be explored. Students will gain a functional knowledge of not only synthesis, but also powerful electronic effect and sequencing options.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 310 - Filmmaking I


    In this course you will be introduced to holistic filmmaking. Technical aspects such as character, plot points, color palettes Aristotelian drama, shooting, lighting and video compositing will add to your current shooting and editing skills. In this course you will begin your journey toward becoming an independent filmmaker by creating professional quality digital film work suitable for festivals, competition distribution or personal portfolio. You will also investigate the aesthetic and sociological issues inherent to time-based media through research and screenings.
    Prerequisites: MMG-230
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 315 - Filmmaking II


    In this course students will apply their understanding of genre, theory and technology to film production. In a cohort based learning environment students will create digital films inspired by historical, theoretical and critical movements. Students will solidify and deepen their directorial voice and locate themselves within the film history cannon. In addition this class screens and analyzes a number of short films to provide a foundation for each student film and its technical treatment.
    Prerequisites: DFM-310
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 320 - The Business of Film


    Students examine the business of the film industry highlighting areas where film and business intersect. Specific areas of study include: (1) the development of business related knowledge and skills necessary for effectively maintaining a professional film career, (2) the vocabulary terminology, and structure of the film industry and (3) the distinction between film and the business aspects of the industry at the corporate level. The course will serve the student wishing to increase his/her understanding of common business practices related to the film industry as well as the student who is considering further study of film business management.
    Prerequisites: Must complete 30 credits before taking this course.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 325 - Advanced Cinematography


    Advanced Cinematography begins where the introductory course Cinematography and Lighting ends, allowing students interested in focusing on cinematography to develop their skill sets and aesthetics. The course offers journeymen students of cinematography work in lighting, lenses movement, crew management and scene coverage. Over the course of the semester, students will produce a number of short works in both field and studio environments as well as study examples of popular cinematography and technical issues.
    Prerequisites: 57 Credits, “C” or higher in DFM 225 (Cinematography and Lighting) or by permission of the CCM Dean.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 328 - Screenwriting II


    This is an intensive workshop course in writing short original screenplays for those with prior experience in dramatic writing (for stage or screen). Students entering this class will be expected to know the basics of dramatic structure and thinking in images, and to be willing to experiment with a range of formal and thematic approaches to creating and revising work. In this course, working in the short form will allow each student to develop a complete, polished work within one semester, with written feedback on multiple drafts.
    Prerequisites: DFM-228
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 330 - Video Compositing and Special Effects


    This course will introduce you to both the magic and technical demands of special effects and compositing. You’ll learn many techniques including keying, blue screen motion graphics and color correction. In considering the aesthetic role of special effects. You will be able to discern when and when not to introduce special effects in your film. You will work with special effects lighting, makeup and prosthetics, and put it all together with node-based and timeline-based applications to create professional-quality films.
    Prerequisites: Complete DFM-230 DFM-310 is the required corequisite course
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 340 - Film Scoring


    This course will take students through the exciting process of creating music for film. First discussing the history of music in film, and the production process, the course will then dive into the actual process of writing cues for film, including spotting, syncing to picture understanding visual sequences and dramatic intent. Students will be challenged to write cues for a variety of visual sequences in different tempos and moods.
    Prerequisites: Complete DFM-120 or by permission of Dean.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 381 - Independent Study: Film Producer


    Student will be given a feature-length screenplay and orchestrate all pre-production (scheduling budgeting, hiring, gathering funds, etc.) needed in order to get the film moved into the production phase
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 383 - Experimental Moving Image


    Students will explore experimental film production. The course will encourage students to break boundaries and reevaluate their relationship to conventional film by applying inventive formal approaches to conceptually rigorous and challenging content. Students will study the history, theory and artistry of the experimental genre, and produce experimental work of their own.
    Prerequisites: DFM.BFA or CREM.BFA majors with at least 57 completed credits; others by permission.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 389 - Urban Indie Filmmaking


    In this course students will apply their training from the screenwriting and cinematography intensive workshops to their own film productions. In a cohort based learning environment and under the guidance of an experienced filmmaker, students each direct one film and produce another student’s film. In addition to this, the class screens and analyzes a number of short films to provide a foundation for each student’s filmmaking and its technical treatment.
    Prerequisites: Permission to enroll in Summer Montreal Filmmaking Program required. Complete DFM-225 and DFM-228.
    Credits: 6
    CCM
  
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    DFM 410 - Independent Film Project


    This course will introduce you to both the magic and technical demands of special effects and compositing. You?ll learn many techniques including keying, blue screen, motion graphics and color correction. In considering the aesthetic role of special effects, you will be able to discern when and when not to introduce special effects in your film. You will work with special effects lighting, makeup and prosthetics, and put it all together with node-based and timeline-based applications to create professional-quality films.
    Prerequisites: DFM-315
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 420 - Senior Portfolio


    In this course students will finalize and compile their collected film works to create a final reel. Students will also gain fluency in the latest output methods in digital film distribution.
    Prerequisites: DFM-410
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 440 - Advanced Projects in Sonic Arts


    Offers the opportunity to do advanced scoring and sound design work. Students will propose a substantial project (such as scoring a film, or building sound for game levels), then take the project from conception to final recording including composition, sound design orchestration, recording, signal processing mixing and mastering. Some exceptional projects may be selected for live recording sessions in a professional studio. Students will create portfolio pieces that go beyond technical proficiency, honing their work to generate emotional impact.
    Prerequisites: DFM-120 and one of the following: DFM-340, EGD-350 MCM-330. Or by permission of Dean.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 450 - Filmmaking Thesis


    This course is designed for students interested in either graduate level studies, further academic investigation or both. Students will create a personal manifesto and examine in depth a topic by relating it to their own body of work, analyze its historical and theoretical position and produce a written thesis.
    Prerequisites: Must be a Digital Filmmaking major Must have completed 90 credits
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    DFM 490 - Filmmaking Internship


    Students gain practical experience as interns in a professional aspect of filmmaking. The student, instructor and work site supervisor work together to determine specific learning objectives for each student. In addition to involvement in the workings of their placement organization students will complete their own related project.
    Prerequisites: Must be a Digital Filmmaking major to take this course. Must complete 90 credits before taking this course. Permission of Dean or Program Director required.
    Credits: 3
    CCM

Economics

  
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    ECN 110 - Economics, Survey of


    A non-mathematical introduction to the basic principles of macroeconomics and microeconomics. These basics will be of value to students in understanding and formulating ideas relating to economic policy. The course will also work to clarify their economic relationship to our society and to the global community.
    Credits: 3
    BUS
  
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    ECN 205 - Microeconomics


    Discusses the nature and method of economics with emphasis on microeconomic theory. Focus is on demand, supply, market equilibrium, elasticity costs of production and resource pricing. Examines the market structures of pure competition oligopoly and monopoly.
    Credits: 3
    BUS
  
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    ECN 210 - Macroeconomics


    A general survey course that covers theories and applications of macroeconomics. Business firms international economics, labor and government are included. Also examines monetary policy, taxes public finances, economic output and growth, and international trade in the world economy.
    Credits: 3
    BUS
  
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    ECN 255 - Managerial Economics


    This course covers the basic microeconomic theories within a business context as they apply to markets, analysis of cost, producer and consumer behaviors, industrial organization strategic thinking, and pricing strategies. These economic concepts will be continually applied to current events, policy issues, and business situations.
    Prerequisites: Take BUS-115 or MTH-120.
    Credits: 3
    BUS
  
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    ECN 350 - Financial & Economic Modeling


    This course will develop the quantitative skills that are required for any business student. The student will learn key microeconomic principles such as supply and demand, non-quantifiable costs externalities and general economic thinking. The student will also work with quantitative tools including risk analysis, forecasting techniques demand analysis, sales and customer data analysis and quality measurement. The course uses Excel as a training ground for encounters with the best and most interesting principles of business economics financial planning and accounting. The course is designed to teach the skills of building “models” that allow for scenario analysis or to help inform good decision-making.
    Prerequisites: Complete MTH-180, MGT-240.
    Credits: 3
    BUS

Education

  
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    EDU 105 - Foundations of Learning and Practicum


    This course provides students with opportunities to explore how children learn. Students will develop lesson plans and a standards-based mini unit. They will connect the theories of Piaget Vygotsky, Erikson, Dewey, Montessori and Gardner to the real classroom. The course will focus on learning materials, learning environments, and communicating with children. The students will implement a Service Learning project in a local school or agency during their seven-week internship, a long-term assignment during this course.
    Credits: 4
    EHS
  
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    EDU 112 - Integrating Technology


    Students will learn to facilitate the integration of technology skills and concepts through designing supporting curriculum, identifying and evaluating software, and developing and practicing methods for technology use. Students will design lessons and learning opportunities using the ISTE standards for middle/secondary level students. This course prepares education students to develop their professional portfolio.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 115 - Learning Theory


    This course is designed to provide pre-service teachers with the foundations of psychological theory, research, and profesional practice relating to development and learning in classroom settings. The role of psychology of education in studying and influencing teaching and learning will be explored with an emphasis on direct application to planning, implementing, and evaluating instruction in the middle/high school classroom. Students spend two hours a week in a field experience.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 125 - Children’s Literature & the Expressive Arts


    This course introduces the basics of integrating Childrens Literature and the Expressive Arts (art, music and movement and drama) across the curriculum. Students actively participate in activities in all of these areas both in the college classroom and in the local community. The course integrates this study of the Expressive Arts with a study of Childrens Literature including genres, authors, response to literature and reading aloud.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 135 - Teaching Diverse Learners


    Course provides students with an understanding of children and youth with disabilities and other special needs. Students learn about the community services, educational programs, and services designed to help children with special needs reach their maximum potential. Emphasis is on the characteristics of various disabilities, their effect on children and their families, strategies for effective intervention, and special needs and strategies that promote the acceptance of diversity in the classroom. Best practices for inclusion including curriculum adaptations and accommodations, and effective strategies for collaboration among professionals will be discussed. (Spring only; course title changed beginning Spring 2015)
    Prerequisites: EDU-105 or EDU-115
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 150 - Reading and Language Development


    Examines the development of language skills - listening, speaking, reading, writing - and appropriate activities to enhance such skills. A holistic approach to beginning reading will be emphasized. (Fall only)
    Prerequisites: EDU-125
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 160 - Math & Science


    Explores theory, activities, and materials to help the child understand concepts and develop skills in basic math and science. Explores materials that further physical and logic mathematical knowledge.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 205 - Infant/Toddler Seminar & Practicum


    Students explore developmentally appropriate practice for the early care and education of young children from birth through two years of age. The course examines infant/toddler growth and development as well as appropriate curriculum for this age group. The topics of observation, assessment, and diversity are also addressed. In addition, the course explores the essential relationship between parents and teachers. One credit of the course encompasses a half day placement each week in an infant/toddler setting. Students will have to complete a background-check as required by placement site.
    Prerequisites: EDU-105 or course in Psychology or Human Development
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 230 - Content Literacy


    Students will learn to construct a framework for supporting and teaching reading in the content area. We will focus on developing research-based methods, strategies, and procedures for designing instruction that supports literacy in each of the core disciplines: Math, Science, English, and History. We will develop skills in assessing reading levels and teaching vocabulary development and reading strategies. Students spend two hours a week in a field experience.
    Prerequisites: EDU-115
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 245 - Service Learning


    Students will learn how to use service learning as an instructional strategy that blends community service with academic learning. Emphasis is placed on reflection, active student participation, and connecting the curriculum to the real world. Through field experiences students will participate in one or more service-learning projects that will involve service to area schools or child-centered agencies .
    Prerequisites: EDU-115
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 250 - Preschool Curriculum


    Students plan curriculum related to themes as well as develop environments for teaching. Nutrition, parent communication and assessment of children are examined. This course is taken concurrently with Preschool Field Experience (EDU 251).
    Prerequisites: EDU-105 EDU-251 is the required corequisite course.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 251 - Preschool Field Experience


    Students work two half-days or two full days per week in a preschool setting carrying out lessons for small and large groups on a theme-related curriculum. Observations in a variety of preschool classroom areas are completed. This course is taken concurrently with Integrated Preschool Curriculum (EDU 250).
    Prerequisites: EDU-105 EDU-250 is the required corequisite course.
    Credits: 2
    EHS
  
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    EDU 255 - Primary Curriculum


    Students plan lessons and units for teaching in primary classrooms. Emphasis is on social studies curriculum planning for the five to eight year old child. Observations in a variety of primary classroom areas are completed. This course is taken concurrently with Primary Field Experience (EDU 256).
    Prerequisites: EDU-105 EDU-256 is the required corequisite course.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 256 - Primary School Field Experience


    Students work two half-days or two full days per week in a kindergarten, first, second or third grade, planning and carrying out lessons for small and large groups on a theme-related curriculum. This course is taken concurrently with Integrated Primary Curriculum (EDU 255).
    Prerequisites: EDU-105 EDU-255 is the required corequisite course.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 275 - Exploring Young Children’s Learning


    Students explore young children’s learning through,the reading of professional journals, through,discussion and reflection regarding their own,practical experience at the VAEYC Conference, and,through reflective writing focused on their own,classroom experiences. Through the exploration of,young children?s learning students are challenged,to apply their new skills and knowledge in the,development of their classroom curriculum,,routines, and learning environment.,* Students must attend the VAEYC Conference,TO REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE, please go to:,http://classlist.champlain.edu/ycl
    Prerequisites: Attendance at 2 day VAEYC Conference, October 21, 2010 ?,October 23, 2010, is required.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 300 - Classroom Management


    Course will focus on the elements of a successful classroom: space design, selection of appropriate learning materials, daily, weekly and long-range planning, use of support staff, teacher planning and organization, handling behavior and misbehavior, and parental involvement.
    Prerequisites: COMPLETE EDU-250, EDU-251, EDU-255, EDU-256
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 310 - Elementary Language Arts


    This course focuses on the teaching of Language Arts to students in kindergarten through sixth grade and is based on the Vermont Standards. Topics include early literacy development selection and management of a reading program development of reading and writing strategies, and the use of fiction and nonfiction for directed lessons and research. A variety of assessment techniques are also explored. Students spend two hours per week observing and working in a kindergarten through sixth grade classroom. (Fall only)
    Prerequisites: EDU-250, EDU-251, EDU-255, AND EDU-256
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 311 - Elementary Science Methods


    The Vermont and NSTA Standards are used as the basis for course content. Topics will include science process skills, physical science, life science, earth and space science, science and technology, and the scientific experiment. Students complete a long-term thematic unit on a topic of interest, relating lessons to the Vermont and/or NSTA Standards. Commercial science materials and texts will be examined and evaluated. Students will spend two hours per week observing and working in a kindergarten through sixth grade. (Spring only)
    Prerequisites: EDU-250 EDU-251, EDU-255, AND EDU-256
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 312 - Elementary Math Methods


    The Vermont and NCTM Standards are used as the basis for course content. Topics will include number sense and operations, geometry and measurement; function and algebra, fractions and decimals, probability and statistics, use of technology, and problem solving. Hands-on activities and lessons are used to explore each of these conceptual areas. Commercial math materials and texts will be examined and evaluated. Students will spend two hours per week observing and working in a kindergarten through sixth grade classroom where they will do their full-time student teaching in the final semester. (Fall only)
    Prerequisites: TAKE EDU-250, EDU-251, EDU-255, AND EDU-256
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 313 - Elementary Social Studies Methods


    The Vermont and the NCSS Standards are used as the basis for course content. Topics within social studies will include Vermont and US history and geography, local and state citizenship issues cultural comparisons, local, state and national economic systems, nature of conflicts and the changing roles of members of society over time and place. (Spring only)
    Prerequisites: TAKE EDU-250, EDU-251, EDU-255, AND EDU-256
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 315 - Middle School Organization


    Examines ways to structure the learning environment and to organize and implement instruction to best meet students’ needs and maximize their learning. Addresses teaming scheduling, teacher-based guidance/advisories service learning, and family connections. Participants will explore and have direct experience with a variety of planning strategies. They will analyze existing organizational structures and propose improvements upon or justifications for existing practices. Students will spend one-half day per week working in middle school classrooms.
    Prerequisites: EDU-335
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 325 - Science Methods, Middle Grades


    Students will explore science methodology that is,research and experience based, and supported by,National Science Education Standards and Vermont’s,Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities.,We will examine and model an inquiry-based and,constructivist approach to science instruction,through hands-on activities with standards-based,curricula in science. This is the capstone course,that prepares students for student teaching and a,professional position in a middle/high school,classroom. Students spend two hours a week in a,field experience.
    Prerequisites: EDU-115
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 326 - Mathematics Methods, Middle Grades


    Students will explore mathematical methodology,that is research and experience based, and,supported by NCTM curriculum and Vermont’s,Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities.,We will examine and model an investigative,approach to mathematics instruction through,hands-on activities with standards-based curricula,in mathematics. This is the capstone course that,prepares students for student teaching and a,professional position in a middle/high,school classroom. Students spend two hours a week,in a field experience.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 330 - English/Language Arts Methods


    Students will explore the pedagogy that brings together the various bodies of knowledge that inform the teaching of English/Language Arts. This is the capstone course that prepares student for student teaching and a professional position in a middle/high school classroom. Students spend two hours a week in a field experience.
    Prerequisites: EDU-335
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 331 - Social Studies/History Methods


    This course focuses on the pedagogy that brings together the various bodies of knowledge that inform the teaching of History/Social Studies. This is the capstone course that prepares students for student teaching and a professional position in a middle/high school classroom. Students spend two hours a week in a field experience.
    Prerequisites: EDU-335
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 332 - Secondary Teaching Methods


    Students in this course explore the underlying principles of secondary-level pedagogy that will prepare students for student teaching and for a professional position in a middle/high school classroom. Champlain students will explore content-specific methods within the broad framework of “secondary methods.” Students spend one full day each week in a field experience.
    Prerequisites: Complete EDU-335
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 335 - Curriculum Design & Differentiated,Instruction


    Students will investigate and implement differentiated instruction as a philosophical approach to meeting the instructional needs of all students in a middle/high school classroom. We will also examine and apply differentiated learning strategies to real life situations. Differeniating lesson plans and instruction will be modeled throughout this course. This course will include a two-three hour field placement in a differentiated classroom.
    Prerequisites: EDU-245
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 380 - Gender Identity & Bullying in Late,Childhood


    This course is an Independent Study,,How do children learn what it means to be,masculine or feminine, and is there a correlation,between these expressions of gender and bullying?,This course will examine the impact of gender,identity in the socialization of youth in late,childhood and early adolescence. The student and,professor will combine theoretical and field,based research to explore topics such as dominant,gender norms in society, gender identity,development in children, motivations for bullying,and exclusion among students based on gender,norms and perceived identities, and supporting,students through their identity development and,bullying prevention.
    Prerequisites: Permission Required
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  •  

    EDU 381 - Learning, Technology & Media


    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
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    EDU 430 - Student Teaching Seminar


    This seminar was developed to provide students with an opportunity to share and reflect on pedagogical and interpersonal issues they encounter during their student teaching experience. The goal will be to imporove the quality of pre-service teaching. Emphasis will be placed on building a professional learning community with peers. We will explore issues such as assessment, multicultural education, the use of technology, teacher evaluation and emerging trends in education. We will also use this course to develop students’ licensing portfolios.
    Prerequisites: EDU-335 Must complete 90 credits, pass the Praxis I exam and have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better to enroll in this course.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  •  

    EDU 490 - Integrated Curr & Student Teaching


    Students will spend four and one-half days each week as a student teacher in a kindergarten through sixth grade classroom. Lesson plans and a two-week thematic unit will be developed and taught under the supervision of the cooperating teacher and college supervisor. Lesson and unit plans will be linked with the Vermont Standards. Weekly seminars will provide opportunities for students to share learning and teaching experiences as well as to share information on teacher licensing, final portfolio development and job placement. (Spring only)
    Prerequisites: EDU-312 and EDU-313 (Elementary Ed) or EDU-335 (Middle and Secondary Ed). Must complete 90 credits, pass the Praxis I exam and have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better to enroll in this course.
    Credits: 9
    EHS
  
  •  

    EDU 581 - Integrating Financial Literacy Into the,Curriculum


    Students explore personal finance and financial,literacy and models for integrating this topic,into the middle and high school curriculum.,Students will explore their own understanding and,practices of personal finance. They will examine,existing curricula on the topic, review text,books, and listen to presentations from experts in,the field. In addition, participants will use the,National Standards in K-12 Personal Finance,Education to support a Classroom Action Project,focused on integrating financial literacy,knowledge and skills into the curriculum.
    Prerequisites: Bachelor’s Degree
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  •  

    EDU 582 - Building Blocks for Literacy


    BUILDING BLOCKS FOR LITERACY provides a conceptual,understanding of the research-based components,necessary to deliver effective language and,literacy learning opportunities across education,settings. Participants will become familiar with,ongoing evidence-based practices that integrate,current research with family and professional, wisdom and values. Participants will learn how,language acquisition, phonological awareness,,shared book reading and the speech to print,connection contribute to a quality iteracy,program. There will be an in-depth study of,language pragmatics, vocabulary,comprehension and,the alphabetic principle in order to identify,early learning literacy gaps and apply strategies,to scaffold childrens learning.
    Prerequisites: Successful completion of the 12 hour online course OR,previous enrollment in a BUILDING BLOCKS FOR LITERACY® live,training or class.
    Credits: 3
    EHS

Education and Human Studies

  
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    EHS 100 - Making Connections


    Students will meet together in an interdisciplinary, seminar-style setting to build a foundational understanding of integrative thinking and learning and to begin to make connections among the various elements of the Champlain College student-experiences and competencies. Students will take part in a real-world community awareness or service experience as a class and then examine the experience from the perspectives of social work criminal justice, the law, environmental policy education, and psychology.
    Credits: 1
    EHS
  
  •  

    EHS 200 - Hot Topics Seminar


    Students will meet together in an interdisciplinary, seminar-style setting to build a greater understanding of integrative thinking and learning and to add focus on ethics within the EHS professions as they examine hot topics. Students will view provocative movies such as Girls Rising and/or participate with a presenter, and critically examine the experience from the perspectives of social work criminal justice, the law, environmental policy education psychology, and their experiences in Core and LEAD.
    Prerequisites: Complete EHS-100 or have transfer students status
    Credits: 1
    EHS
  
  •  

    EHS 210 - Social Justice Intensive


    Students will meet together in an interdisciplinary, seminar-style setting to build a greater understanding of integrative thinking and learning and to add a focus within a social justice context. Students will participate in an off-campus service learning project and critically examine the experience from the perspectives of social work, criminal justice, the law, environmental policy education, psychology, and additionally consider their experiences in Core, and LEAD.
    Prerequisites: Complete EHS-100 or have transfer students status
    Credits: 1
    EHS
  
  •  

    EHS 300 - Community Advocacy and Inquiry Abroad


    Students will connect in-depth community involvement with academic learning to enhance understanding of theoretical and practical approaches of their professional field. They will complete a project specific to their field site. The international setting facilitates comparative investigation of international and American community issues while developing integrative approaches and solutions. Service settings will vary to accommodate individual majors. Class will meet once a week for two hours and 45 minutes; students will spend at least three hours per week at the field site.
    Prerequisites: 57 COMPLETED CREDITS. CO-REQUISITE ANY APPROVED DUBLIN COR-330 COURSE.
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  •  

    EHS 390 - EHS Internship Experience


    Students will connect this internship experience with academic learning to enhance their understanding of a chosen aspect of theoretical or practical approaches of their professional field.  Within the course, they will develop an internship proposal including their learning outcomes, their final project plan, and their own relevant reading list.  They will participate in an internship, face-to-face classes, and an online forum throughout the semester to support their identified learning outcomes. Internship settings will vary to accommodate individual majors or minors.
    Prerequisites:  60 Credits, EHS Major or EHS Minor
    Credits: 3
    EHS
  
  •  

    EHS 495 - Int’l Service Internship: the Gambia


    This course allows EHS majors to partake in international service internship placements. The course includes a four-week trip to The Gambia, a small but thriving country in western Africa. The international setting facilitates learning around cultural sensitivity and global awareness. The course in intended for upper-level students from all EHS majors and should ideally be taken during the summer between the junior and seniors years. Admission to the course is selective and will follow an application process.
    Credits: 3
    EHS

Electronic Business

  
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    EBC 110 - Internet, Information & Business


    Introduces the history and evolution of the Internet and information systems by examining the structure, business applications, systems and architecture. Students will learn terminology and gain a working knowledge of Internet-related hardware, software, communications protocols, and capabilities. Hands-on multi-media and web-based projects will reinforce the topics covered. This course utilizes an online course management system, which students will use to post assignments, take quizzes and engage in discussion outside of class. Reliable internet access outside of the classroom is required.
    Credits: 3
    BUS
  
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    EBC 320 - Implementing Internet Bus Solutions


    Introduces the skills involved in collaborative technology-related projects. Allows students to participate in cross-functional teams of developers, designers, and electronic-business professionals for the purpose of creating custom e-business solutions for real organizations. This course serves as a capstone course for three majors: Electronic Business and Commerce Multi-Media and Graphic Design and Web Site Development and Management. (Spring only, starting 2002)
    Credits: 3
    BUS
  
  •  

    EBC 330 - Internet-Based Business Rel.


    Provides an in-depth exploration of the largest and most important aspect of Internet commerce: Business-to-Business. Case studies and current events combine to illustrate the full integration of Internet technologies into business at every level from manufacturing, supply chain and inventory management to customer relationships. This course is only offered online and is a required course for all e-Business Management majors in order to reinforce the skills needed for effective online communication. Reliable Internet access outside of the classroom required.
    Prerequisites: EBC-110 Must complete 30 credits before taking this course.
    Credits: 3
    BUS
  
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    EBC 410 - Net-Based Business Relationships


    Credits: 3
    BUS
  
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    EBC 411A - IBT: Search Engine Optimization


    Search engines have become the most widely used websites on the Internet today being used by consumers looking for products, business seeking services, and students performing research. This course will introduce students to the process for optimizing a website for both organic and paid search engine placement. Students will learn how to strategically decide on which keywords to include or buy and will have the opportunity to practice buying keywords in different pay-per-click search engine channels.
    Prerequisites: MKT-110 + 90 credits or Continuing Professional Studies student.
    Credits: 1
    BUS
  
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    EBC 411B - IBT: Google AdWords


    Google.com is the most widely used search engine and accounts for 54% of all web searches as of 2005. Combine this with the fact that search marketing is the fastest growing advertising medium and you’ve got one of the most powerful marketing mediums available today. This class will guide students on how to effectively setup and manage Google AdWords campaigns including the following: strategy, implementation, ad creation budget management and analysis.
    Prerequisites: MKT-110 + 90 completed credits or Continuing Professional Studies student.
    Credits: 1
    BUS
  
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    EBC 411C - IBT: Web Analytics


    Measuring a website’s activity is becoming more important everyday. This class will explore topics such as finding out how people found your site how they explored it, and how to optimize the site to offer the visitor the best experience. Students will learn how to use web analytic software to measure return on investment, conversion rates and overall site activity such as visits, page views and top referrers.
    Prerequisites: MKT-110 + 90 completed credits or Continuing Professional Studies student.
    Credits: 1
    BUS
  
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    EBC 411D - Internet Bus Tactics: Social Networking


    Teens and college students continue to utilize new methods of interactive and online communication. The newest way is through social networking websites such as MySpace.com, Facebook.com and Flickr.com. Students will critically examine the top social networking sites, build business profiles and explore marketing tactics ranging from gaining group members to running ads on these different sites. Ethical issues and challenges encountered with the use of these sites will be discussed. Blogs and networks will also be addressed.
    Prerequisites: MKT-110 + 90 completed credits or Continuing Professional Studies student.
    Credits: 1
    BUS
  
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    EBC 411E - IBT: Online Visibility


    Creating online visibility for a business, service or product is becoming more complex as more and more tools become available. Moving outside the realm of advertising and building websites, this course will provide students with hands-on experience in using the web to disseminate information about their product or service in this examination of PR-oriented online tactics. E-mail marketing, RSS feeds, news release distribution viral marketing, and referrals will all be explored and utilized as students disseminate information utilizing online tools.
    Prerequisites: MKT-110 + 90 completed credits or Continuing Professional Studies student.
    Credits: 1
    BUS
  
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    EBC 411F - IBT: Ethical Policy Development


    Technological advances tend to outpace the development of sound and ethical policy in the business community. Students will examine appropriate and inappropriate uses of customer and employee data, and will write an extensive privacy policy developed for a specific business. Students will learn to formulate written policy as an effective and efficient means of addressing ethical issues.
    Prerequisites: MKT-110 + 90 completed credits or Continuing Professional Studies student.
    Credits: 1
    BUS
  
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    EBC 460 - Internet Issues and Strategies


    Examines the strategic and social implications of,Internet technologies. Students will examine how,the Internet has changed business and how that,change has affected society. Current events,,in-depth reading, analysis, discussion and hands,on application of new internet tools will be used.,This is a hybrid course which meets both face to,face once per week and online through the use of,an online course management system. Reliable,internet access outside of the classroom is,required.
    Prerequisites: Must complete 90 credits before taking this course.
    Credits: 3
    BUS

Electronic Game Develop

  
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    EGD 100 - Game History and Development


    How did the game industry evolve into the eye-popping, genre-driven, electronic industry it is today? We examine the history of electronic games, the evolution of the computer and console market, and a host of today’s most influential and significant games. Then we turn a critical eye toward testing games, learning to tune gameplay designs for increased playability and fun. As we play-test Beta versions of games to uncover and fix as many defects as possible, we’ll also learn how to design effective tests, use bug database software, and interpret player feedback. Firsthand experience is invaluable when it comes to evaluating and tuning the strength of your own game designs.
    Prerequisites: GDES.BS, GART.BS, EGPR.BS, MCRM.BS, CREM.BS students only or by permission of CCM division Dean
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  •  

    EGD 105 - Game Art Fundamentals


    Game Art Fundamentals covers the essential art and design topics of elements of design, color theory, and composition. These principles are introduced through digital art practices and media used in the game development industry and the Game Art & Animation Program.
    Prerequisites: GART.BS students only or by permission of GART Program Director
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    EGD 110 - Introduction to Game Design


    What’s the difference between an FPS and an RPG? Are discovery and exploration important in every style of game, or can they detract from a cool game concept? We answer these questions by examining genres in games and analyzing some of the gameplay styles associated with them. Then, once we’ve discovered strengths and weaknesses inherent to particular game styles we’ll develop skills necessary to formulate and evauluate our own original gameplay ideas.
    Prerequisites: GDES.BS, MCRM.BS, CREM.BS students only or by permission of CCM Division Dean
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  •  

    EGD 115 - Introduction to Game Art and Animation


    Introduction to Game Art and Animation is an exploration of the world of game art, the technologies in use and what it takes to become a game artist. Students study the history aesthetics, technology, practices and workflow used in all facets of game art creation. This class prepares Game Art and Animation students for their academic professional program and the game industry.
    Prerequisites: GART.BS or CREM.BS students only, or by permission of the CCM Division Dean.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  •  

    EGD 120 - Visual Communication for Game Design


    Communication is at the center of success for a Game Designer. Visual Communication for Game Designers takes an integrated approach exploring technology, visual design aesthetics and principles, and visual design communication forms most often used by game designers to successfully communicate their ideas to their teams and build and test good user interaction models.
    Prerequisites: Game Design majors only.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
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    EGD 202 - Game Technology I


    Game designers need an essential skill set that allows them to realize their concepts through working prototypes. In Game Technology I students learn how to develop and manipulate game mechanics and environments through visual and traditional scripting tools. This class is the first in a series that supports skills needed for level editing and design, prototyping, and working in game engines.
    Prerequisites: CIT-135 (Introduction to Computer Theory) or CSI-140 (Introduction to Programming) and GDES.BS or GART.BS students, or by permission of CCM Division Dean.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  •  

    EGD 205 - 2D Game Art


    In 2D Game Art, students will explore the many ways in which 2-dimensional bitmap and vector art are used in game media and the tools and processes necessary to create this type of artwork. Topics include 2D game genres and aesthetics, sprite design and animation storyboarding, 2D backgrounds and cut-scenes interface design and tools, and the use of 2D artwork across a variety of platforms from mobile to consoles.
    Prerequisites: ART-135, EGD-115, and GART.BS student, or by permission of CCM Division Dean.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  •  

    EGD 212 - Principles of Game Design


    The Principles of Game Design focuses on preparing the game designer to lead in the development of a game. The course covers the full spectrum of a game designer’s role and responsibilities including conceptualization documentation, team management, and defining all aspects of the design from target market to the world and gameplay.
    Prerequisites: GDES.BS, CREM.BS ONLY or by permission of CCM Division Dean.  EGD-110, EGD-120 and EGD-202 are required corequisites.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  •  

    EGD 215 - 3D Art, Introduction to


    This course is an introduction to the process of creating digital art using 30 graphics software. With an emphasis on foundational 3D concepts and aesthetics, the practices of modeling, texturing and animation will be explored. Students will learn about and work within the limitations of graphics production for realtime gaming environments but much work and skills at the introductory level are transferable to film and video production. This course also introduces students to rigorous personal production habits and the process of constructive critique.
    Prerequisites: GDES.BS, GART.BS, EGPR.BS, CREM.BS students only, or by permission of CCM Division Dean. GDES students must complete EGD-120; EGPR and CREM students must complete EGD-120 or EGD-105; GART students must complete EGD-105 and EGD-115.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
  
  •  

    EGD 220 - Game Production I


    Learn to function as a productive member of a game design team. As we work through the phases of game development– exploring the collaborative responsibilities of artists and designers along the way–we’ll learn to document game ideas and bring them to fruition as solid, playable, 2D game prototypes.
    Prerequisites: GDEA, GART, EGPR, MCRM majors only, or by permission of the Dean of the Division. Game Design majors, complete EGD-212 and EGD-202 with grade C or higher. Game Art and Animation majors, complete EGD-205 with grade C or higher. Game Programming majors, complete EGP-200 with grade C- or higher. Management and Creative Media majors, complete EGD-100 and co-req MGT-260.
    Credits: 3
    CCM
 

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